Planting schemes we have borrowed!

Where do we get our garden design ideas from? Although I look a gardening books and receive a number of gardening magazines I seldom take ideas directly from them. However, when we visit gardens we often get inspired to borrow the idea. These get jotted down in our garden visits note book. For example many of you will have seen this planting scheme at Sissinghurst Castle.

purplevine

Sissinghurst Castle from Steve Reed’s blog

We have a wall (much smaller) with a similar aspect which for many years we had struggled to find a suitable planting scheme. When we saw this it was a eureka moment! The planting was  Vitis vinifera purpurea and Clematis Perle d’Azur under planted with Belladonna Lilies. I even had an email correspondence with the head gardener at Sissinghurst to check out the exact varieties!

Not quite as impressive but it works and apart from a little pruning once a year is more or less maintenance free. This was planted up about ten years ago so you can imagine our surprise and delight when this came out this year.

Only one so far but a start. I suspect the bed does not get enough sun but now they have started flowering maybe more next year.

One of our favorite places to stay in Devon is Lewtrenchard Manor; a great location for visiting Devon gardens

lewtrenchard-manor-houseAlthough not an ideal photograph, in the center of the picture is a raised water feature which is surrounded by a small wall. The wall is covered by a small climbing roses and once again Clematis Perle d’Azur. Very simple and we had the ideal spot to repeat this idea.16_07_23_2939Here it is around a well near our front door. This time with Rosa May Queen and Rosa Phyllis Bide and you can also just see the Sissinghurst scheme in the background.

Visiting  a fantastic private garden in Norfolk designed by Tom Stuart Smith we came on this planting scheme.visit_20110712_999_33Box balls with Hakonechloa macra under trees. This is the green Hakonechloa not the more common golden varieties which would have been too much.  We had an area of the garden where I had tried to imitate the Japanese tightly pruned azelas plantings. However as azelas do not do well in our area I had used a range of hebes. It worked well but the hebes did not like too much pruning and got too big. We needed a rethink and in our garden we now have20_06_16_2690although the box has been replaced with yew balls due to a scare with box blight. In spring we have snowdrops and Anemone Nemerosa before the grass comes through. The trees are Robinia pseudoacacia ‘Lace Lady’ a unique small tree worth considering in any garden. Again very little maintenance required and the scheme gives year round interest.

Actually at the back of this bed the stone pillar is the base of a granite Japanese lantern which fell over recently and is waiting to be put together again. Not so easy as it needs four strong men to lift the top! Any wind tends to come across the field at the back and the grass then moves like a river.10_07_16_2857

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19 thoughts on “Planting schemes we have borrowed!

  1. What an inspring post, thank you. Lovely to see hakonechloa en masse as a sea of grass, such a dramatic contrast to the static clipped evergreens. I grow several different cultivars of Japanese Forest Grass, some of the recent seasonally green forms such as Samurai have great red tones in autumn.

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  2. many thanks. It is always great when lots of people like a scheme. (even if I had borrowed it) We also have the yellow version and are planning to expand that next year.

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  3. I love that blue clematis. Never lets me down. I’ve got the belladonna lilies- but they haven’t flowered for 5 years. I hope I haven’t got to wait another five years! I love that grass which does indeed move like the sea when the wind blows. Very beautiful. See you soon- Karen x

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