End of the Month View – May 2018

18_05_31_8669The weather this spring has meant everything is a bit late. Further more once things came out they seem to go over very quickly. This time last month the tulips were bursting out but now they have all gone. However, they looked fantastic for a couple of weeks. Likewise the alliums seem to be going over quickly and now at the end of May the roses are looking great. Interestingly the above average rain we have had has resulted in many of the flowing shrubs putting on great displays and the lawn has never looked greener.To the left of the pond the main rose is Rosa ‘Shot Silk’. It does not repeat well but is usually the first rose in the main part of the garden to flower. 18_05_31_8677The rose that normally has the accolade of being first is Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’ which is also out at this moment. Again not a repeat flower but gorgeous never the less.18_05_31_8662To the right of the pond is Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ and Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ is a fantastic rose, flowering through the summer into Autumn Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’ has the most beautiful peach coloured flowers.18_05_31_8671Else where next the the big pond is another beauty, Rosa ‘Fantan Latour’.18_05_31_8672Not really a climber but no one told it! It had covered the whole of this wall although the flowers tended to be near the top so we cut it back very hard to just above the Choisya ternata and it has returned a great display.18_05_31_8659To the right of the main garden behind the urn is another favorite,  Rosa ‘Alchemist’. Well named as the flowers start of gold a slowly change to cream.18_05_31_8670Another view towards Rosa ‘Alchemist’ with Aruncus dioicus is the middle ground.18_05_31_8678Not all the roses are climbers. Until last year we thought these were  Rosa ‘Irene Watts’ and as a result of my blog there was an extensive conversation which resulted in us finding out that they are in fact Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen. Apparently many rose nurseries have been incorrectly supplying Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen as Rosa ‘Irene Watts’. What ever the name they are great roses.18_05_31_8679Near by by the back door we planted Lonicera periclymenum ‘Scentsation’ to give off a scent as we step out of the house. It is great to see it coming into its own.

 

In two weeks the garden is open to the public. See advert in the side bar. There is still lots to do including getting many dahlias planted.

 

The wall across the lawn has been looking good and is just about ready. Maybe a final weed is required.18_05_31_8660I am sure Allium Christophii are planning to take over this part of the garden!18_05_18_8656Two different globe Alliums always put on a good show under the pleached lime hedge. However, you can see the effect of the winter on the lavender where several plants have died! In addition to these losses we have also lost some salvias and a Euphorbia ‘Mellifera’.18_05_31_8665The border to the right with the  Allium Christophii  and some very large Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’.18_05_31_8661Looking closer you can see Rosa ‘Mutabilis’ starting to flower.18_05_31_8676The Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ looking great climbing into Rosa ‘Sombreuil’18_05_31_8667The border to the left of the main lawn was planted up with grasses etc last year and is beginning to develop although we need to do plenty of weeding here.18_05_31_8668On the edge of this bed Geranium ‘Patricia’ and Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ provide a great mix of colour.

2018 Gardening Hours
Week beginning May 26th Total 2018 to-date Average per week
35 324 15

Do have a look at Helen The Patient Gardener’s blog where you fill find links to other gardens at the end of April. Thank you to Helen for hosting this meme.

End of Month View – August 2017

I started doing an End of Month View in August 2016 having seen Helen Johnstone’s blog,  The Patient Gardener, on my reader. In August 2009 she invited bloggers to join her End of the Month View by adding a comment and link to their End of Month View.

This simple idea has certainly caught on with many bloggers contributing to a global End of Month View community each month. Recently demands on Helen’s time have meant she is reluctantly giving up her hosting of the End of Month View.

The idea is too good to let it disappear and I have offered to pick up the mantle of hosting the End of Month View. I am sure you will all join me in thanking Helen for hosting this over the last 8 years and wish her the very best for the future.

In the meantime please add your comments to my blog together with a link to your End of Month View. Also please add a link back to here at the end of your blog so that other readers can find their way to all the contributors to the End of Month View.
Thank you.

Glebe House Garden – End of the Month View – August 2017

The weather this August has very variable with lots of rain and grey overcast skies. Temperatures have ranged from very cool, cool enough to actually switch on the heating in our house, to record breaking temperatures at the end of the month. As always the best growing plants have been the weeds and the borders need to be patrolled frequently for specimen weeds which can suddenly appear!17_08_25_6898This is the view I often centre on in my EoMV, looking across our main lawn to the old kitchen garden wall.17_08_25_6899The same walls and border looking diagonally across the lawn. 17_08_27_6913 And looking along the other diagonal. Originally the kitchen garden wall extended across the lawn to form a kitchen garden enclosed on three sides and open on the fourth where there was probably a hedge. 17_08_25_6889The late summer border is starting to look very full with many of the herbaceous plants growing very tall and needing plenty of staking to prevent them falling across other smaller plants.17_08_25_6906At the corner of this bed is one of those lucky combinations of colour with the soft pink of Geranium sanguineum striatum, the dark red of Osteospermum ‘Tresco Purple’ and the red of Salvia ‘Cerro Potosi’. The white/pink osteospermum is a very hardy osteospermum my mother gave me but as we do not know the variety and so we call it Nancy’s osteospermum after my mother!17_08_27_6917The tall plant is Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’. This was only planted in April this year and has certainly grown well. However, “the jury is still out” on whether it stays. Yes the flowers are there but many are covered with the green leaves. Maybe the flowers will be more prominent later in September. We will have to wait to see.17_08_27_6918The star of the border continues to be Ricinus communis ‘Impala’ 17_08_27_6920The leaves of which are absolutely fantastic. These are grown from seed and as such are only a few pence each.

To the right of this corner before the pond are a couple of blue flowered plants. Clematis ‘Wyevale’ at the back and Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’ towards the front and in the detail picture (with a red salvia photo bombing!). Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’ has been relatively hardy although I do take cuttings each year.17_08_25_6904Coreopsis ‘Redshift’ a new plant this year at the front of the corner bed. Lots of flowers but seems to flop very easily.17_08_28_6923I found this caterpillar making great speed across the lawn. It was about 3 inches long with two pairs of false eyes and a small horn on its tail. At first I was fooled and thought it was a snake! A bit of research identified it as probably an elephant hawk moth caterpillar.17_08_27_6921The other corner of the wall has a green oak pergola to provide a seating area and some shade. The rose growing up the pergola is Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’

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Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’ 

The pergola has a number of grape vines that grow across the top to provide the shade. Grape vines grow at a rapid rate and in the summer some pruning of the new growth is require to achieve a dappled shade and also to encourage bunches of grapes to form.17_08_25_6895This year I could only prune half the vines back as a pigeon had decided to make a nest in the vine. 17_08_28_6925This week two chicks hatched out and are doing well but the vine remains un-pruned.

At this time of year the border to the left of the pergola contains mostly dahlias; Bishop of Llandaff and Bishop of Auckland. Although our dahlias started slowly the weather through August has given them all a real spurt of growth with Bishop of Llandaff  up to five feet high.17_08_25_6896Looking back from the pergola to the corner bed.17_08_25_6893

You can just see a rose on either side of the pond. These were planted this year and are Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen, a small rose plant that seems to like the location.

To the right of the pergola the outstanding plant is Salvia involocruta bethellii. This has proved to be very hardy. We cut it down to the ground each year but it produces huge plants with many flowers.17_08_25_6900The end of the wall on the right has a very sad looking Cotinus ‘Nottcutts Variety’. Normally it has very attractive dark coloured foliage but this year it seems to be dying! The foliage has gone dry and brown and is spreading through the shrub. Looks like this will be coming out soon.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning
August 19th
Total 2017 to-date Average per week
32 703 21

A busy week in the garden, cutting out some of the “autumn” in the border, a lot of hedging and of course weeding.

All are welcome to join in with the End of Month View community. You can use it how you like all I ask is that you add a link to your post in the comment box below and if possible it would be great if you could link to this post from your post.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2017

June is here and the garden has come to life. This must be one of the easiest GBBD to write with just so many blooms to choose from. But first a few high level photos of the garden taken from our conservatory which is upstairs in our house.17_06_14_6203Looking down the garden Rosa Rambling Rector has taken over the apple tree which was damaged earlier this year in a storm and beyond more roses given the whole garden a perfumed scent. 17_06_14_6206Towards the garden wall Rosa Blush Noisette on the pergola in the corner.17_06_14_6204Across the large pond a multitude of blooms of delphiniums, geraniums etc.17_06_14_6205And looking back towards the pleached lime hedge the underplanting of Rosa Alfred de Dalmas and Lavandula augustifolia ‘Hidcote’ is all coming together.

Looking at some of the blooms in more detail

Rosa Irene Watts is putting on a great display with Carpenteria californica in the background just coming into flower.

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Carpenteria californica

17_06_14_6267Rosa Joseph’s Coat produces these interesting multi coloured blooms.17_06_14_6257Clematis Rhapsody always puts on a good display.17_06_14_6208Recently I talked about the wall across the lawn. It has now been transformed with a hardy pink Diascia noname that is flowering along the wall.17_06_14_6238

Rosa Anne Boleyn is one of may favorite David Austin roses. Is not too tall and has a fantastic scent.17_06_14_6235Potentilla atrosanguinea var. argyrophylla Scarlet Starlit providing bright red stars in the border.

Delphinium Black Knight survived the recent winds!17_06_14_6232Near the Delphinium Black Knight a Rosa Iceberg in flower.17_06_14_6230Knautia macedonica probably a self set but the colour combination works well.17_06_14_6229Hosta Sun & Substance together with Clematis Boulevard Angelique in a lead planter. This planter is on automatic watering. Last year the drain holes blocked and the planter was flooded for some time. Everything was removed and new drain holes made. The original clematis died but the hosta has come back and shows great promise with the new clematis.17_06_14_6228Rosa Bonica as a standard rose, newly planted last year.

Rosa Alfred de Dalmas under planting of the pleached lime hedge.

Iris laevigata Snowdrift and Iris laevigata in the large pond.17_06_14_6224Clematis Madame Julia Correvon another reliable clematis.17_06_14_6222The large pink flowered plant is Geranium palmatum which has a habit of self seeding everywhere but how can you fault it when it looks like this.17_06_14_6221The first dahlia in flower this year, Dahlia David Howard.17_06_14_6220Salvia nemorosa Ostfriesland (East Friesland)17_06_14_6219Rosa Felicite Perpetue along the bottom of the garden.17_06_14_6217Sambucus nigra Lace Lady17_06_14_6216Lysimachia atropurpurea Beaujolais. The problem with plant nurseries is that you always see something that you have not got but feel you have a place for it. This was one such purchase last week!

Geranium Patricia a great mid border plant.

Rosa Ghislaine de Feligonde in full bloom.17_06_14_6211The largest Crambe Cordifolia we have ever grown.17_06_14_6210

Clematis Chelsea and newly planted Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen.

Viola cornuta horned pansy.

Clematis noname…………..I must look through all my files!17_06_03_5905The magic of some clematis does not die when the flowers are over. Gold seed heads remain.17_06_03_5904More Allium Christophii17_06_03_5902Tradescantia Innocence, what more is there to like!

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
Week beginning June 3rd Total since June 19th 2016 Average per week
49 963 19

End of the Month View – May 2017

It is totally crazy in the garden just now. All the beds need to move to there summer look. There are over 70 large dahlias which are in pots waiting to fill the odd space left by tulips etc. In addition we have visited plant nurseries several times to get additional stock as we are changing the “look and feel” of a couple of areas. In the vegetable area everything seems to need attention with frost having finished it it time for planting out courgettes, tomatoes, dwarf beans etc.. And in two weeks we have an open garden! As such this will be a short end of the month.17_05_31_5878This is my classic end of the month view across the garden. You can see that everything is growing at a great speed and most of the climbing roses are in full bloom.17_05_31_5879The bed on the left which is mainly roses are just coming into flower.17_05_31_5880In front of these roses is a Tradescantia, Tradescantia ‘Innocence’17_05_31_5881The bed in the left corner is having some major changes. the tall herbaceous at the back is being extended round to the left with the addition of Veronicastrum virginicum ‘Fascination’, Cimicifuga ramosa ‘Atropurpurea’ and Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’.17_05_31_5882The Crambe Cordifolia has gone completely mad with the most enormous flower head. Some time ago I said we might move this as, although the flower head can be stunning, the leaves are not very interesting and take up a lot of space. It must have heard me and is demonstrating that it should stay!17_05_31_5883Small beds in front of the pond have for some reason always been difficult. We have changed the rose to Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen with Clematis ‘Chelsea’ a ground cover clematis. Early days but so far so good.17_05_31_5885The bed to the right of the pond has not yet had the early summer tidy up. I anticipate some dahlias will go in here. However, the Allium Christophii are looking great and on the wall Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ and Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’ are blooming away.

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Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’

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Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’

17_05_31_5889The bed on the right already looks full but as you can see there are some Helenium ‘Moerheim Beauty’ waiting to go in. On the wall Rosa ‘Mutabilis’ and another Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ are in bloom. The very large cat mint is Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’.

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Rosa ‘Mutabilis’

17_05_31_5893Again you cannot beat the Allium Christophii.17_05_31_5895A new clematis growing up the pergola,  Clematis ‘Monte Cassino’. 17_05_31_5897Just to the right of the end of the month view is the urn bed. Here Rosa Alchemist  always puts on a great show at this time of year.

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Rosa Alchemist

 

Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – April 2017

It is very much spring now. We have had the snowdrops, aconites and many other early spring bulbs. The tulips have been and still are splendid but some are beginning to fade. We have had some very warm days and the new foliage is bursting out everywhere and its sensational. Everywhere you go at this stage in the growing year fresh leaves are opening up giving clean fresh colours after the dormant buds of winter. This blog is looking at some of the foliage currently in Glebe House Garden.

This is Philadelphus coronarius Aureus which has changed in a couple of weeks from a bundle of dry looking sticks to a golden display.

Ferns are unfolding leaves in their spectacular way. Unless you look every day you will miss the leaves as they unfold.

New rose leaves often give strong coloured displays. Here are three roses in very different stages of development. Rosa omeiensis pteracantha had grown to about seven metres high and had out grown its space. We cut it right down to ground level last autumn and are now being rewarded by some beautiful new shoots. Rosa Irene Watts was rejuvenated a year ago February when it was also cut down to within a couple of centimetres of the ground. Last year it started new growth which was pruned to shape in the winter and now is looking very healthy. Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen is a new rose that has been planted next to the water feature by the main lawn. 17_04_19_5309Some of the smaller plants are also putting on a spring display. Euphorbia myrsinites is technically in flower but the effect is a foliage delight.17_04_19_5311And similarly Euphorbia griffithii Dixter is in flower but look at the leaves which are green stained with red giving a huge pallet of colour.

I blogged about this pleached lime hedge.  It is now coming into leaf.17_04_19_5319This cardoon Cynara cardunculus has come from nowhere in a week!

Hostas are coming up everywhere if the slugs and snails will let them. To avoid too much damage to the leaves you need to control the slugs and snails before the leaves come out so it is worth trying to remember where you have Hostas planted.17_04_19_5312Fatsia japonica never really loses its leaves but in spring the new growth is refreshing and very architectural.

Itea ilicifolia only drops a few leaves in the winter and these pictures show the quality of foliage that has come through the winter. 17_04_19_5310Aruncus dioicus is an herbaceous plant that is cut down in the winter and is now coming back quickly for a summer display.17_04_19_5297These Betula ermanii were planted a few years ago in groups of three which will eventually grow together. When they were planted the bark was a bronze brown colour but as they grow they are developing a warm silver bark. These have been jet washed to maximise their colour.

Variegated foliage is always worth thinking about when planting shrubs

and dark foliage should also be considered.

Cornus alternifolia Argentea eventually should grow into a reasonable sized tree. For some reason it has been very slow to get going but the structure and leaves are very nice.17_04_19_5318Another flash of gold from Sambucus racemosa Sutherland Gold 

Do have a look at Christina of My Hesperides Garden where she encourages us to look at the foliage in our garden rather than focusing on the flowers on the 22nd of each month. You will find links to other participating gardens there. Thank you Christina for hosting this meme.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
30 751 17