Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2017

Just four week since the April Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day and what a difference. Spring has gone and we are now into summer although the weather has yet to fully realise that!17_05_13_5700The first wave of aliums are looking splendid throughout the garden.17_05_14_571817_05_14_5724These have been in for many years and over time have multiplied to the extent we are having to reduce them despite their displays at this time of year.17_05_13_5696These are actually killing off the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter!17_05_10_5686nevertheless the alium flower is a thing of beauty.17_05_10_5687And whats left of the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter is too.

17_05_14_5713This is Rosa Madame Gregoire Staechlin and is normally the first rose to flower in our garden but not this year as Rosa Old Blush China started flowering on April 8th!

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Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

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Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

17_05_13_5710Another rose in flower is Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere.

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Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere

17_05_13_5691Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere is on the end wall beneath our conservatory from where we can also see a fantastic display of wisteria.17_05_10_5667Wisteria seems to have been very successful all around the area we live in which must have been helped by the lack of hard frosts this year.17_05_14_5725The scent from these flowers permeates into the house and is a delight.17_05_10_566617_05_10_5665 Below the wisteria a  Choisya ternata  which is in also in flower.17_05_13_5695Actually this plant has been moving itself. Originally it was planted under the steps leading up to the conservatory. It obviously decided it needed more light and over time has moved!17_05_14_5714We have a number of hardy osteospermums in the garden. These have come through the winter well and are already putting on a good display.17_05_10_568017_05_14_5719However, we always have a backup by taking cutting and bringing them on in the greenhouse. 17_05_14_5716Cerinthe major Purpurascens is not really hardy for us although sometimes they self seed and come through the winter as this one has.17_05_14_5717but there are also replacements in the greenhouse should they not self seed.17_05_14_5721Clematis have started flowering. This is  Clematis Daniel Deronda,17_05_13_5701and this is Clematis Guernsey Cream.17_05_14_5723One of the first geraniums to flower is Geranium himalayense with a Potentilla Abbotswood in the background.

Potentilla Abbotswood and Potentilla notknown.

The pond Iris sibirica looking great in front of the yellow Philadelphus coronarius Aureus.

Another early geranium is Geranium renardii. This is quite an unusual geranium with interesting foliage as well as attractive flowers.17_05_10_5674Deutzia x rosea Carminea a relatively new addition to the garden.17_05_13_5702Global warming means this Euphorbia Mellifera is able to grow and do well now in our garden.17_05_13_5698One of the climbing roses Rosa Shot Silk has started to flower.17_05_14_5727This is a beautiful rose but does not repeat well.

And I have added all the photos below.  Click on any one to scroll through them all. It is also possible to see them full size by clicking on the full size button (bottom right).

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
13 791 17
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End of the Month View – April 2017

At the end of December I took you on a frosty walk around our garden. This month I plan another walk around the garden but this time going in the reverse direction taking in the different views as we progress around. The old kitchen garden divides the garden making circular walks the best way to see the whole garden.

17_04_25_5361This is the view you get as you enter the garden through a gate in the garden wall. The lovely tulips are Tulip Ballerina. The urn is designed to be a focal point as you enter. In fact when the plants have grown up in the summer the view of the garden is restricted making an element of surprise as you walk in.17_04_23_5346From this point, with the urn on our right, we can see diagonally across to the steps which provide access to the higher level lawn. The Tulip Red Impression is continuing to create a good display.17_04_23_5347As we move further into the garden it begins to open up. In the distance you can just see small lake which used to be the fish ponds for the rectory that was next door.17_04_23_5348Further still on the paved area we get a different view down the garden past the tree that got damaged recently in a storm. Behind us is the back door of our house with a number of climbing roses on the walls.17_04_25_5359This one is Rosa Old Blush China. Actually it is not meant to be a climber but if it wants to climb I happy with that. 17_04_25_5360Next to Rosa Old Blush China is Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere. These two roses are both flowering very early this year.17_04_23_5324Going up the steps on to the higher lawn we get to the spot where my classic End of Month View is taken. (See January, MarchOctober, September, August)The tulips are continuing to put on a display and the aliums are just beginning to open up.17_04_23_5325The blossom on the apple tree is out and looking good despite the storm damage.

Behind us is an area, beneath some large lime trees, which we treat as a woodland garden. We have made some cobble paths here to enable easy access. A  seat provides an interesting viewing place across the garden.17_04_25_5354Continuing on around the garden we can see the end of the garden wall on the right.17_04_25_5375In the circular bed as well as  the Brunnera Mr. Morse,  Tulip Hageri Splendens is now in flower.

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Tulip Hageri Splendens

17_04_25_5367We have now come round to the bottom right hand corner of the garden and are looking up behind the garden wall. The planting here is mainly shrubs designed for relatively easy maintenance.17_04_25_5373Continuing on and just before the first yew hedge there is a small pond on the left. This pond has been designed to be very nature friendly with a sloping edges enabling easy access to the water and an easy escape route should something fall in!17_04_25_5377Having walked along behind the wall we get to a small grass lawn and flower bed. The Geranium himalayense has just started to flower and looks great with the tulips. The bed is called Ivy’s bed after the lady that lives in the cottage over looking the border.17_04_25_5378Across the lawn we get to the Italianate area. Twenty years ago this was all paddock and we added the pond and landscaping. As I mentioned, in 2016 the pond developed a leak and a major repair job was done. With this disruption we decided to renovate the whole area.17_04_23_5343The gravel borders were contained with wooden edging and this had rotted away. These are being replaced with metal edging and the gravel, into which the garden had been growing, is all being cleaned up! The obelisks each have had a rose planted in their centre to grow up with clematis. Work has yet to be done on the joints between the paviours which need cleaning and re-pointing.17_04_23_5344The seat by the pond is one of our ‘gin & tonic’ seats and this is the view from there. With all the work on the pond it is going to take a year to stabilise.17_04_25_5352The little green house at the end of this area is even fuller and there will soon be standing room only!17_04_25_5379Looking back at the ‘gin & tonic’ seat the Carpinus betulus Frans Fontaine columns are just coming into leaf.17_04_25_5380Having completed the tour we get to the shady border by the end of the house with Erythronium Pagoda, various hostas and ferns providing the main planting.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
27 778 17

Do have a look at Helen The Patient Gardener’s blog where you will find links to other gardens at the end of April. Thank you to Helen for hosting this meme.

The seasons are moving on

Time to pick the last fruits of the vegetable plot

We only have a very small vegetable plot for the two of us. However it is amazing how much can be grown and all the freezers are full to bursting withe the produce.

16_10_02_3542Borlotto Lingua di Fuoco beans.16_10_02_3532The green house haul. Tomatoes, Aubergine Bonica, and Cucumber Cucino. Now its time to clean the glass inside ready for seed planting.16_10_02_3541Last but not least the Winter Squash Barbara Butternut.

Putting the garden to bed for the winter

As well as sorting out the herbaceous plants the other significant work is pruning climbing roses.img_9702This is Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere in all her spender.

The first autumn clear up done.

Looking forward to 2017

Its October and time to get out the garden notebook and order plants that we have noted down and need to fill out gaps etc. This year I am planting my clematis now to take advantage of the warn soil. Normally I forget and buy them in a mad rush in February! I have been buying from Thorncroft Clematis and here is my list with links to the plants on their website. The Brief Overview also comes from their website.

Name # Brief Overview
Ernest Markham 1 The light magenta-red blooms have a deeply textured surface and beautifully crimped margins. A fabulous companion to climbing roses and, if hard pruned can be grown in a patio container.
BURNING LOVE ‘Vitiwester’ 1 The glorious vibrant red flowers have a textured surface and gently recurved, twisted tips. Their distinctive crown of contrasting yellow stamens adds to the attraction of this outstanding performer.
Venosa Violacea 1 (syn. viticella ‘Venosa Violacea’). The eye-catching flowers have broad deep purple margins that merge towards a white bar which has rosy-purple veins running through it. A lovely crown of stamens further enhance the striking effect of these blooms. Awarded RHS Award of Garden Merit.
SEA BREEZE ‘Zo09063’ 2 A huge abundance of flowers that have a fresh pale violet-blue colour become almost white at the centre of the tepal and surround a dark ‘eye’ of anthers in the middle.
Blekitny Aniol (BLUE ANGEL) 1 The gorgeous pale, mauvy-blue flowers have a pretty satin sheen across their deeply textured surface. Its crimped and wavy margins taper to pointed tips. At dusk the flowers become almost luminous. Beautiful! Awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit.
Victoria 1 The gorgeous deep pinky-mauve semi-nodding flowers have a rose-pink flush along their central bars which fades as the blooms mature to light pinkish-mauve. A wonderful companion for your climbing roses. Awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit.
Étoile Violette 4 The dark bluey-purple flowers have beautifully contrasting pale yellow stamens. An outstanding performer that adorns gardens across the world. Awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit.
The President 2 This handsome old clematis has deep purply-blue star-shaped flowers with slightly paler bars and attractive beetroot-red stamens.
Dutch Sky 1 The pretty bluey-white flowers merge to light blue margins and tips. The reverse has the same colouring with distinctive purple ribs. It is exceptionally free-flowering.
Abundance 1 The pretty semi-nodding pinky-red flowers have a deeply textured surface and crimped margins. Aptly named, the blooms are indeed produced in great abundance.
Mrs Cholmondeley 1 The wonderful light mauvy-blue flowers have pale coffee-coloured anthers. A fabulous old cultivar which, if hard pruned, can be grown in a patio container. Cholmondeley is pronounced Chumley. Awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit.

I plan to plant many of these so they can scramble through established roses and some on existing obelisks in the Italianate garden which is having a make over as the pond is repaired.

08_05_16_2371The other big planting at this time of year is bulbs, mostly for spring and summer displays. I normally buy these from Parkers. Here is this years list.

Aconites 100 Eranthis Hyemalis
Allium 20 Schubertii
Anemone 20 Anemone Nemerosa Robinsoniana
Crocus 100 Chrysanhus Ladykiller
Crocus 100 Siberi Tricolour
Eremurus 10 White Beauty Favourite
Lilium 20 Rosella’s Dream
Lilium 20 Inuvik
Lilium 20 Elodie
Lilium 10 Miss Lily
Narcissi 100 Tete-a-Tete
Tulips 100 Flaming Purissima
Tulips 100 Triumph Tulips Mixed
Tulips 100 Red Impression
Tulips 100 Doll’s Minuet
Tulips 100 Purple Blend
Tulips 50 Hageri Splendens
Tulips 50 Humilis
Tulips 50 Turkestanica

Many of the bulbs are to supplement existing plantings. I have taken photographs to identify where there is a shortage; maybe due to bulbs not returning or maybe they provided dinner for some animal! We do not lift our tulips as we have very sandy loam and they come back each year. However, we can look forward to a lot of bulb planting over the next few weeks.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
31 313 20