Too much sun after Hoby Open Gardens

18_07_10_9123Have just been away for two weeks following Hoby Open Gardens and it has been hot; very hot for England at 32 centigrade! And we continue to have had no rain of any consequence since the middle of May. 18_07_10_9124We left a garden looking quite good but now it is crisp and dry. Our soil is a sandy loam and tends to dry out quickly but in an English climate this is usually not an issue..18_07_10_9125The main lawn was the walled kitchen garden for a large house next door and the interesting thing now is that wherever there were paths in the original kitchen garden the lawn drys out fastest as you can see in the above.18_06_14_8766The lawn on June 16th before the sun!

So rather than show pictures of dried up plants I thought I would go back to the open garden event.18_06_17_8771After a hectic week getting everything ready the weekend arrived and was a great success. Eleven gardens opened, included Glebe House, and in addition we provided lunches, tombolas, an art exhibition, plant stalls,a white elephant stall (ie a junk stall), a Pimms bar and lets not forget the cream teas. Our garden was one of the venues for cream teas and after Diane had made 250 scones we made almost £900 on the teas alone. Overall the money is still being counted but it looks like we have made almost £7500 which, for a village of just 100 houses, is excellent.  The money is going to do some improvements in our 13th century village church.18_06_22_9093The roses were stunning with Rosa Rambling Rector covering the old apple tree and Rosa Bobby James on the right just coming into flower. Probably one of the best comments was when one of the visitors said she always came into our garden to see the rose ‘Rampant Rector’!

Here are some of the roses in the garden:

18_06_22_9119The main pond had recovered from when it emptied itself  and the water stayed crystal clear.18_06_20_9087and there were no snakes to be seen here either.

18_06_22_9118We only have one hanging basket and luckily it is on automatic watering so it just as good now.

The dahlias were a bit disappointing as the slow spring had held back the flowers. The only flowering dahlias were Dahlia Arabian Night and Dahlia David Howard. Now they are all struggling due to lack of rain.18_06_22_911018_06_22_9109The Delphinium Black Knight and Rosa ‘Iceberg’ made a great show.18_06_22_9113This shrub always provides interest. It is Carpenteria californica with Rosa ‘Irene Watts’ in the foreground. Carpenteria californica is quite a rare plant in English gardens and it needs a sheltered position as it is rather tender.18_06_22_9105June is peak season for poppies which self seed throughout the garden.

We do not have a huge vegetable plot. However, for open gardens even the vegetable plot needs to be weed free.

Elsewhere there were plenty of flowers  to see.

18_06_22_9111As you can see the hedges had not been cut. Actually we ran out of time, however, the current thinking is that it is better to cut box hedging a little later to help prevent blight.

2018 Gardening Hours
Week beginning June 30th Total 2018 to-date Average per week
0 462 18

Holiday week so no gardening.

 

End of Month View – September 2017

The weather this September continues to be very variable. One day the sun will be out with temperatures around 20c, perfect gardening weather, the next will be grey and wet all day. 17_09_29_7312What ever the weather Autumn is certainly setting in now. Looking down the garden the day after the grass was cut there is already a carpet of leaves forming.17_09_27_7288Else where the Euonymus  alatus ‘Burning Bush’ is looking fantastic with its Autumn foliage.17_09_27_7296The usual EoMV across the garden has not changed that much from last month. It does look a bit duller but I think this is mainly the lack of sun for the photograph!17_09_27_7308In more detail the corner bed on the left has been really successful with the Ricinus communis ‘Impala’  continuing to put on an excellent display. The dark leaves and white flowers of Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Eight’ off setting the yellow flowers of Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’. 17_09_27_7307Last month I said I had been disappointed with Helianthus ‘Lemon Queen’ and several people said how  much they valued this plant. 17_09_27_7306Now I take back my words as you can see what a great plant to have in the Autumn border. However, due to its size good staking is definitely required.17_09_27_7304Almost lost in this corner is Achillea millefolium ‘Terracotta’ together with the magenta of  Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’ . A great demonstration of the value of complementary colours. With so much large herbaceous planting it is easy for smaller plants to get lost. We will be giving some thought to how to make more of the front of the border.17_09_27_7298The main rose bed is to the left of the wall. The roses are coming to the end of their blooming period. 17_09_27_7291However there are still some beauties to see. This is Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’ a very reliable rose around two to three feet high, a great perfume and repeat flowing. What more could you want?17_09_27_7309The view across the lawn to the right hand part of the wall. From this distance it looks very green but there are some points of interest to explore.17_09_27_7299Another good repeater is Rosa ‘Mutabilis’. When it is windy this rose always gets hit. It has been stripped twice of its flowers this year but it keeps coming back. It is planted as a climber on the wall and as it is a bit tender seems to respond well to this..

As well as the Rosa ‘Mutabilis’ above , Salvia involocruta bethellii continues to perform.17_09_27_7295Another Autumn favourite, both for insects and flowers, is the Sedum although in this case I have no idea about the variety. Sedums must be one of the easiest plants to grow and propagate and as such end up being slotted into gaps without recording what they are! We always do a ‘Chelsea chop’ on these which seems to give strong stems and less flopping. 17_09_27_7297At the end of the bed on the right is Cotinus ‘Nottcutts Variety’. Normally a very dark variety.

It is clearly not well. It looks like Verticillium wilt. The RHS website gives the following information.

Verticillium wilt is caused by the soil-borne fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. albo-atrum. Both infect a very wide range of garden plants through the roots and then grow upwards in the water-conducting tissues, causing wilting of the upper parts due to water stress. Wilting is mostly seen from spring until autumn.

Plants affected include Chrysanthemum, carnation, aubergine, potato, tomato, cucurbits and strawberries. Woody plants are also affected, including Acer, Cotinus, Rhus, Berberis, Catalpa, Cercis and Rosa, but the full host range is very wide indeed. Conifers are not affected.

See RHS Verticillium wilt for more information. It looks like I will be removing this and we will have to rethink what to replace it with.

The Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’ by the pond has really grown a lot since last month and is looking stunning. We already have many cuttings of this in the green house as insurance against a hard winter.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning September 23rd Total 2017 to-date Average per week
17 794 20

Between the rain showers work in the garden includes; finishing off some hedge cutting, removing specimen weeds that are always growing, repairing a blocked fountain and mowing the lawn. The moss in the lawn has become very severe in places so it looks like I will be doing some scarification soon.

All are welcome to join in with the End of Month View community. You can use it how you like all I ask is that you add a link to your post in the comment box below and if possible it would be great if you could link to this post from your post. Thank you.

 

Roses, Roses, Roses

This year the roses have been particularly good and this week I have featured some of the roses that were out today.

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Rosa ‘Jacques Cartier’

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Rosa ‘Bonica’

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A Noname but looks like a David Austin rose so some research required

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa Bobby James

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Rosa ‘Bonica’ as a standard rose

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa Iceberg

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Rosa ‘Eglantyne’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Empress Josephine’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa ‘Alfred de Dalmas’

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Rosa ‘Awakening’

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa ‘Crocus Rose’

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Rosa Felicite Perpetue

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Rosa Felicite Perpetue

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Rose Ballerina

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Rosa ‘Joseph’s Coat’

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Rosa ‘A Shropshire Lad’

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Rosa ‘Kent’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

A photographic blog as we have been away and time is short.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning June 17th Total 2017 to-date Average per week
0 558 22

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – June 2017

June is here and the garden has come to life. This must be one of the easiest GBBD to write with just so many blooms to choose from. But first a few high level photos of the garden taken from our conservatory which is upstairs in our house.17_06_14_6203Looking down the garden Rosa Rambling Rector has taken over the apple tree which was damaged earlier this year in a storm and beyond more roses given the whole garden a perfumed scent. 17_06_14_6206Towards the garden wall Rosa Blush Noisette on the pergola in the corner.17_06_14_6204Across the large pond a multitude of blooms of delphiniums, geraniums etc.17_06_14_6205And looking back towards the pleached lime hedge the underplanting of Rosa Alfred de Dalmas and Lavandula augustifolia ‘Hidcote’ is all coming together.

Looking at some of the blooms in more detail

Rosa Irene Watts is putting on a great display with Carpenteria californica in the background just coming into flower.

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Carpenteria californica

17_06_14_6267Rosa Joseph’s Coat produces these interesting multi coloured blooms.17_06_14_6257Clematis Rhapsody always puts on a good display.17_06_14_6208Recently I talked about the wall across the lawn. It has now been transformed with a hardy pink Diascia noname that is flowering along the wall.17_06_14_6238

Rosa Anne Boleyn is one of may favorite David Austin roses. Is not too tall and has a fantastic scent.17_06_14_6235Potentilla atrosanguinea var. argyrophylla Scarlet Starlit providing bright red stars in the border.

Delphinium Black Knight survived the recent winds!17_06_14_6232Near the Delphinium Black Knight a Rosa Iceberg in flower.17_06_14_6230Knautia macedonica probably a self set but the colour combination works well.17_06_14_6229Hosta Sun & Substance together with Clematis Boulevard Angelique in a lead planter. This planter is on automatic watering. Last year the drain holes blocked and the planter was flooded for some time. Everything was removed and new drain holes made. The original clematis died but the hosta has come back and shows great promise with the new clematis.17_06_14_6228Rosa Bonica as a standard rose, newly planted last year.

Rosa Alfred de Dalmas under planting of the pleached lime hedge.

Iris laevigata Snowdrift and Iris laevigata in the large pond.17_06_14_6224Clematis Madame Julia Correvon another reliable clematis.17_06_14_6222The large pink flowered plant is Geranium palmatum which has a habit of self seeding everywhere but how can you fault it when it looks like this.17_06_14_6221The first dahlia in flower this year, Dahlia David Howard.17_06_14_6220Salvia nemorosa Ostfriesland (East Friesland)17_06_14_6219Rosa Felicite Perpetue along the bottom of the garden.17_06_14_6217Sambucus nigra Lace Lady17_06_14_6216Lysimachia atropurpurea Beaujolais. The problem with plant nurseries is that you always see something that you have not got but feel you have a place for it. This was one such purchase last week!

Geranium Patricia a great mid border plant.

Rosa Ghislaine de Feligonde in full bloom.17_06_14_6211The largest Crambe Cordifolia we have ever grown.17_06_14_6210

Clematis Chelsea and newly planted Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen.

Viola cornuta horned pansy.

Clematis noname…………..I must look through all my files!17_06_03_5905The magic of some clematis does not die when the flowers are over. Gold seed heads remain.17_06_03_5904More Allium Christophii17_06_03_5902Tradescantia Innocence, what more is there to like!

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
Week beginning June 3rd Total since June 19th 2016 Average per week
49 963 19