End of the Month View – May 2018

18_05_31_8669The weather this spring has meant everything is a bit late. Further more once things came out they seem to go over very quickly. This time last month the tulips were bursting out but now they have all gone. However, they looked fantastic for a couple of weeks. Likewise the alliums seem to be going over quickly and now at the end of May the roses are looking great. Interestingly the above average rain we have had has resulted in many of the flowing shrubs putting on great displays and the lawn has never looked greener.To the left of the pond the main rose is Rosa ‘Shot Silk’. It does not repeat well but is usually the first rose in the main part of the garden to flower. 18_05_31_8677The rose that normally has the accolade of being first is Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’ which is also out at this moment. Again not a repeat flower but gorgeous never the less.18_05_31_8662To the right of the pond is Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ and Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’ is a fantastic rose, flowering through the summer into Autumn Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’ has the most beautiful peach coloured flowers.18_05_31_8671Else where next the the big pond is another beauty, Rosa ‘Fantan Latour’.18_05_31_8672Not really a climber but no one told it! It had covered the whole of this wall although the flowers tended to be near the top so we cut it back very hard to just above the Choisya ternata and it has returned a great display.18_05_31_8659To the right of the main garden behind the urn is another favorite,  Rosa ‘Alchemist’. Well named as the flowers start of gold a slowly change to cream.18_05_31_8670Another view towards Rosa ‘Alchemist’ with Aruncus dioicus is the middle ground.18_05_31_8678Not all the roses are climbers. Until last year we thought these were  Rosa ‘Irene Watts’ and as a result of my blog there was an extensive conversation which resulted in us finding out that they are in fact Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen. Apparently many rose nurseries have been incorrectly supplying Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen as Rosa ‘Irene Watts’. What ever the name they are great roses.18_05_31_8679Near by by the back door we planted Lonicera periclymenum ‘Scentsation’ to give off a scent as we step out of the house. It is great to see it coming into its own.

 

In two weeks the garden is open to the public. See advert in the side bar. There is still lots to do including getting many dahlias planted.

 

The wall across the lawn has been looking good and is just about ready. Maybe a final weed is required.18_05_31_8660I am sure Allium Christophii are planning to take over this part of the garden!18_05_18_8656Two different globe Alliums always put on a good show under the pleached lime hedge. However, you can see the effect of the winter on the lavender where several plants have died! In addition to these losses we have also lost some salvias and a Euphorbia ‘Mellifera’.18_05_31_8665The border to the right with the  Allium Christophii  and some very large Nepeta ‘Six Hills Giant’.18_05_31_8661Looking closer you can see Rosa ‘Mutabilis’ starting to flower.18_05_31_8676The Clematis ‘Jackmanii’ looking great climbing into Rosa ‘Sombreuil’18_05_31_8667The border to the left of the main lawn was planted up with grasses etc last year and is beginning to develop although we need to do plenty of weeding here.18_05_31_8668On the edge of this bed Geranium ‘Patricia’ and Geranium ‘Johnson’s Blue’ provide a great mix of colour.

2018 Gardening Hours
Week beginning May 26th Total 2018 to-date Average per week
35 324 15

Do have a look at Helen The Patient Gardener’s blog where you fill find links to other gardens at the end of April. Thank you to Helen for hosting this meme.

End of Month View – December 2017

The end of the month and the end of the year!  Happy New Year and good gardening in 2018.

I have not been able to get into the garden much during the last few weeks. Much of “putting the garden to bed” for the winter was done in November so I will use this opportunity to look back over the year.

Click on the small images to see them full size.

January

17_01_30_4716Many of the beds look exactly as they were following the winter clean up. However, there are signs of spring to be seen.

February

17_02_24_4992February brought a storm which removed a branch from an old apple tree. I was undecided as to whether to keep the reduced tree or to start again.  So far we have keep it.

Elsewhere snowdrops are filling many of the beds

March

17_03_01_5017The arrival of lambs in the field beyond our garden is always one of those events to make you smile.

Spring flowers are everywhere now.

April

17_04_07_5243The garden is beginning to glow with tulips, blossom and the first roses.

May

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Roses really start to come out now. And everywhere flowers of every kind are looking great.

June

17_06_14_6204All the borders are filling out. The pond that was finally repaired is also looking as it should and the water lilies that spent almost a year out of the water have survived!

July

17_07_12_6694Herbaceous plants are taking control of the borders now. The alliums are still there but the herbaceous plants are the stars now.

August

17_08_25_6891In January these beds looked empty. Now the flowers are up to six feet high in just a few months.

September

17_09_27_7307Borders are now “more” than full. Staking the plants is the biggest issue to prevent them falling on each other.

October

17_09_29_7312Autumn is on its way but around the garden there are still plenty of flowers.

November

17_10_30_7446The first frost of the year. the dahlias do not like it but some of the roses continue to flower. Now is the time to take the climbing roses off the wall for pruning and tying in their new growth for next year.

December

The borders have all been cleared ready for another spring in November. We have escaped to the sun. The garden has been told to look after itself!

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning December 23rd Total 2017 to-date Average per week
0 1004 19

An average of 19 hours a week and by week we have:2017-hours

I hope these pictures have wet your appetite for the new gardening year. Looking forward to 2018 and a Happy New Year to you all.

If you would like to join in with this meme you are very welcome – add a link to your post in the comments box and please link to this post from your blog so readers can find other EoMV posts. There are no rules about what you post. Maybe you want to focus on one area through the year or give a general tour, whatever suits you is fine with me.

Berberis koreana (Korean Barberry) ‘Red Tears’ an excellent plant with four seasons.

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September 27th

Ever so often a chance purchase of a shrub gives a pleasant surprise.  Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ was one such purchase and it is certainly worth considering for any garden.

Berberis, commonly known as barberry, is a large genus of deciduous and evergreen shrubs from 1–5 m tall found throughout the temperate and subtropical regions of the world. Extremely hardy, Berberis koreana (Korean Barberry) is certainly one to consider for almost any garden. Berberis koreana grows with a dense, oval to rounded habit, at a moderate rate, up to 4-6 ft/120-180 cm tall and wide. It performs best in full sun to part shade, in dry to moist, well-drained soils and is not fussy about soils provided they are not soggy or wet. The main Berberis koreana cultivar is ‘Red Tears’

Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ will give four seasons of interest:-

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April 17th

This semi-evergreen shrub is native to the Korean peninsula and Japan. Its bark is reddish brown and the twigs are densely armed with short spines in groups of one to five. At this stage the main interest are the very crisp green leaves.

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April 25th

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April 25th

In mid-spring, this small, multi-stemmed. semi-evergreen shrub produces striking pendulous clusters of golden-yellow flowers. At this stage the flowers are beginning to hang in clusters but are not fully open. The leaves are also getting a red tint to their edges

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May 10th

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May 10th

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May 13th

By now the flowers are fully open and have quite a “honey” scent which fills the still evening air.

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August 19th

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August 19th

The flowers are followed by an abundance of tiny oval fruits which at this stage are yellow tinged with red.

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August 25th

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August 28th

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August 28th

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August 28th

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August 28th

The fruits ripen to bright red by the fall and are attractive to birds.

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September 27th

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September 27th

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October 9th

and then persist across the winter. Therefore extending the season of interest of this ornamental shrub.

Overall Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ is an excellent shrub giving year round interest with virtually no maintenance.

Other points to consider:

Pro:

Fairly pest-free, easy to grow and to care for. Light pruning may be required to maintain a lovely shape. Drought tolerant and  deer resistant, what more could you wish for!

Perfect choice as a single specimen plant or massed in borders, for foundation plantings or as an informal barrier, screen or hedge.

Against:

The shrub can sucker from the roots and form colonies

End of Month View – November 2017

This year November has been the major clean up of the garden ready for winter and more importantly ready for spring.17_11_23_7452You can see that most of the herbaceous materials have been removed. In some ways I would liked to have keep more of the seed heads for the birds etc., however, in order to plant the bulbs (over 1500 bulbs, see list here)  and spread mulch we need access to the beds.17_11_23_7453The twiggy material goes through a shredder and is then added is bagged up ready to add to the compost heap, the softer material goes straight on to the heap. Only the pertinacious weeds (eg ones with tap roots) get thrown away. In this way we recycle at least 95% of all the plant material. The green link stakes are stored in one of our outbuildings. Given we have 1000’s of such stakes in many different sizes this is quite an exercise in itself. If anyone has a good suggestion of how to store these stakes I would love to know it.17_11_23_7455A border almost totally cleared ready for bulbs etc

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And the same corner in August!

17_11_28_7465Tulip bulbs ready for planting17_11_28_7464And the under-gardener planting bulbs on a cold, crisp November day.

17_11_24_7462Now we have easy access to the climbing roses I need to turn my mind to pruning and tying in the new growth.17_11_28_7463To the right of the pond more tulips bulbs waiting to be planted.17_11_24_7460The plastic sheet hanging from the pergola serves two purposes. It keeps the rain off the wooded bench but more importantly it keeps the rain off two small peach trees which are planted in tubs either side of the bench. This should avoid peach leaf curl.17_11_24_7461Another border ready for winter and the spring.17_07_27_6785And the same border in July.17_11_28_746717_11_28_7466Elsewhere we have planted bulbs and have spread a mulch dressing onto the soil. This is Ivy’s bed on the garden map. There is plenty more mulch spreading yet to do!

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning Nov 25th Total 2017 to-date Average per week
30 1004 21

If you would like to join in with this meme you are very welcome – add a link to your post in the comments box and please link to this post from your blog so readers can find other EoMV posts. There are no rules about what you post. Maybe you want to focus on one area through the year or give a general tour, whatever suits you is fine with me.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – October 2017

It is the middle of October, in two weeks we will put the clocks back at the end of summer time. The evening will be dark and we will feel winter is really here.

For this GBBD I decided to walk around taking photos of the various blooms that are still out.  If you had asked me before the walk I would have thought maybe a dozen good blooms. How wrong I was! Here are the photos I took (and there could have been more!)

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Salvia ‘Cerro Potosi’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

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Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’

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Rosa ‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’

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Rosa ’Wildeve’

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Rosa ‘Lichfield Angel’

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa ‘Bonica’

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Rosmarinus officianalis horizontalis

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Ricinus communis ‘Impala’

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Anemone ‘Honorine Joubert’

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Clematis ‘Ville de Lyon’

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Cyclamen Self set hardy variety

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Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Cosmos ‘Versailles tetra’

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Aster ‘Starshine’

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Dahlia David Howard

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Rosa ‘Queen of Sweden’

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Clematis ‘Lady Betty Balfour’

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Rudbeckia ‘Rustic Dwarfs Mixed’

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Rudbeckia x Hirta Hybrida Cherokee Sunset

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Helianthemum ‘Ben Fhada’

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Phlox paniculata Uspekh

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Verbena bonariensis

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Aconitum x cammarum ‘Bicolor’

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Achillea ‘Credo’

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Rosa ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’

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Osteospermum ‘Tresco Purple’

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Rudbeckia ‘Herbstone’

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Aster praealtus

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Rosa ‘Shot Silk’

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Rosa ‘Awakening’

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Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Eight’

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Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’

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Achillea millefolium ‘Terracotta’

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Coreopsis ‘Redshift’

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Clematis ‘Chelsea’

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Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’

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Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’

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Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’

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Salvia involocruta bethellii

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Dahlia Bishop of Auckland

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Sedum ‘not known’

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Cerastostigma willmottianum ‘Forest Blue’

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Dahlia Bishop of Llandaff

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Geranium riversleaianum ‘Mavis Simpson’

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning
October 7th
Total 2017 to-date Average per week
33 847 21

 

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – July 2017

17_07_12_6705The weather this year has been a challenge. It has been dry and hot and we seem to be advancing into that gap between Summer and Autumn even so it is only the end of July. Many plants are dry and crispy and having been away for a couple of weeks we have not had time to remove those specimen weeds that always seem to grow the best! However, there is still much to show this month.

Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ is doing well and has picked up considerably since we gave it a good watering.

The dahlias have been slow to bloom probably lack of water. Here is Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’ with Hemerocallis ‘Catherine Woodbury’17_07_12_6662Helenium ‘Moerheim Beauty’ looking great as always.17_07_12_6663Cosmos bipinnatus ‘Purity’17_07_12_6695almost lost in the border with other perennials.17_07_12_6664Another day lily, Hemerocallis ‘Stafford’.17_07_12_6665A favorite with the bees and looking at its best Eryngium giganteum ‘Miss Willmott’s ghost’17_07_12_6666The blue globes of Echinops ritro ‘Veitch’s Blue’. This magnificent variety produces stiff silvery stems with dark green, silver-backed thistle-like leaves which terminate in brilliant dark, vivid blue globes the size of a spiky golf ball.

Dahlia Twyning’s After Eight the white flower offset by the dark foliage.17_07_12_6667Anthemis tinctoria ‘Sauce Hollandise’ need supporting as it grows but gives a real splash of colour.17_07_12_6672One for the back of the border. Achillea filipendulina ‘Cloth of Gold’ will grow to six feet.17_07_12_6673Another echinops, Echinops Humilis ‘Taplow Blue’ also grows to around six feet.17_07_12_6700And here they are together with Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’.17_07_12_6671A useful gap filler for the front of the border is Mesembryanthemum and it is easy to grow from seed.17_07_12_6668Potentilla ‘Gibson’s Scarlet’ another useful plant for the front of the border.17_07_12_6669One of my favorite dahlias, Dahlia Bishop of Auckland.  17_07_12_6670Always unexpected, Verbena bonariensis plants itself where it wants to grow but it is always a delight.

One of the best, Rosa ‘Bonica’ 17_07_12_6678Day lily, Hemerocallis ‘Lemon Bells’17_07_12_6681and in the same border Hemerocallis ‘Catherine Woodbery’

Eremurus White Beauty Favourite doing well as they were only planted last November.17_07_12_6679Achillea ‘Credo’ was planted in 2016 and is now looking much stronger.17_07_12_6706The bottom of the garden with Stipa gigantea and17_07_12_6684 Echinacea.17_07_12_6686Leucanthemum ‘Goldrausch’ a good strong  Shasta Daisy.17_07_12_6687Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ with17_07_12_6688Phlox paniculata Uspekh in the background.

By the large pond the seat is surrounded by lilies. Lilium Inuvik and Lilium Inuvik. Easy to do, just plant bulbs in pots November/ December and wait.17_07_12_6694Phoxs have done particularly well this year. In the foreground is Phlox paniculata ‘Bright Eyes’.17_07_12_6696Lavandula augustifolia ‘Hidcote’ is always hard to keep looking good and not woody.17_07_12_6697We only have one hanging basket and here it is!

A couple of clematis, Clematis ‘Perle d’Azur’ and Clematis ‘Jackmanii’.17_07_12_6699A great honeysuckle which we took as a cutting from another garden.17_07_12_6701Rosa ‘Meg’ a beautiful climbing rose that was in the garden 23 years ago when we brought the house and garden.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning July 8th Total 2017 to-date Average per week
13 571 20

Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day – May 2017

Foliage is everywhere now. At this time of year it is always new, fresh and clean. Last week we have had the first real rain this year, about 60mm in 48 hours, which has been great for the garden and has ensured all the leaves had been newly washed.17_05_21_5795Hostas catch the rain and look great.17_05_21_577017_05_21_5771Here a big leaf of Hosta Sun & Substance getting larger by the day.17_05_21_5808 A creeping thyme, growing in a planting pocket in the paving, is now covered with new small leaves. In four weeks it will turn purple with small flowers.17_05_21_5788Another herb, Oregano Origanum vulgare Aureum, has a wonderful yellow/green foliage and makes a great border plant as well as being useful for cooking.17_05_21_5791Arum italicum Pictum puts on a good display but this is short lived as the leaves disappear once it has flowered.17_05_21_5800Plume Poppy, Macleaya cordata, grows to about 2m and has the most delicate leaves.

Ferns continue to unwind their leaves17_05_21_5801and some just put out beautiful coloured leaves such as this Japanese Painted Fern, Athyrium nipponicum Pictum.17_05_21_5804These are the leaves of Geranium renardii and don’t they look great.17_05_21_5780Plenty of foliage but the purpose of the photo was to show the plants waiting to be put into the garden! As well as my dahlias, which have been hardened off before planting out, last Wednesday it rained and rained so what do gardeners do. We went to a good plant nursery and filled up the car with more plants!17_05_21_5782Dahlias in pots having been grown from tubers.17_05_21_5803And in the green house now the foliage of the future just staring out.17_05_21_5802Courgettes  waiting to be planted. Interesting the golden varieties also have gold leaves.

The gold foliage of Sambucus racemosa Sutherland GoldBerberis tunmbergii AureaPhysocarpus opulifolius Dart’s Gold and Euonymus fortunei Emerald ‘n’ Gold looks really great.

And the red foliage is not to be outdone! Heuchera ‘noname’, Berberis thumbergii ‘Red Chief’, Berberis thunbergii ‘Rose Glow’ and Acer palmatum dissectum.

The yew hedges have all put on new growth and look stunning.

Varigated foliage Euonymus fortunei ‘Emerald Gaiety’, Cornus alternifolia Argentea and Osmanthus heterophyllus variegatus also adds interest.17_05_21_5784The beautiful leaf of Rodgersia aesculifolia gets bigger as the year goes on.17_05_21_5783Lastly the new leaves on the pleached lime hedge are wonderful.

Do have a look at Christina of My Hesperides Garden where she encourages us to look at the foliage in our garden rather than focusing on the flowers on the 22nd of each month. You will find links to other participating gardens there. Thank you Christina for hosting this meme.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
28 832 17

Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – April 2017

It is very much spring now. We have had the snowdrops, aconites and many other early spring bulbs. The tulips have been and still are splendid but some are beginning to fade. We have had some very warm days and the new foliage is bursting out everywhere and its sensational. Everywhere you go at this stage in the growing year fresh leaves are opening up giving clean fresh colours after the dormant buds of winter. This blog is looking at some of the foliage currently in Glebe House Garden.

This is Philadelphus coronarius Aureus which has changed in a couple of weeks from a bundle of dry looking sticks to a golden display.

Ferns are unfolding leaves in their spectacular way. Unless you look every day you will miss the leaves as they unfold.

New rose leaves often give strong coloured displays. Here are three roses in very different stages of development. Rosa omeiensis pteracantha had grown to about seven metres high and had out grown its space. We cut it right down to ground level last autumn and are now being rewarded by some beautiful new shoots. Rosa Irene Watts was rejuvenated a year ago February when it was also cut down to within a couple of centimetres of the ground. Last year it started new growth which was pruned to shape in the winter and now is looking very healthy. Rosa Pink Gruss an Aachen is a new rose that has been planted next to the water feature by the main lawn. 17_04_19_5309Some of the smaller plants are also putting on a spring display. Euphorbia myrsinites is technically in flower but the effect is a foliage delight.17_04_19_5311And similarly Euphorbia griffithii Dixter is in flower but look at the leaves which are green stained with red giving a huge pallet of colour.

I blogged about this pleached lime hedge.  It is now coming into leaf.17_04_19_5319This cardoon Cynara cardunculus has come from nowhere in a week!

Hostas are coming up everywhere if the slugs and snails will let them. To avoid too much damage to the leaves you need to control the slugs and snails before the leaves come out so it is worth trying to remember where you have Hostas planted.17_04_19_5312Fatsia japonica never really loses its leaves but in spring the new growth is refreshing and very architectural.

Itea ilicifolia only drops a few leaves in the winter and these pictures show the quality of foliage that has come through the winter. 17_04_19_5310Aruncus dioicus is an herbaceous plant that is cut down in the winter and is now coming back quickly for a summer display.17_04_19_5297These Betula ermanii were planted a few years ago in groups of three which will eventually grow together. When they were planted the bark was a bronze brown colour but as they grow they are developing a warm silver bark. These have been jet washed to maximise their colour.

Variegated foliage is always worth thinking about when planting shrubs

and dark foliage should also be considered.

Cornus alternifolia Argentea eventually should grow into a reasonable sized tree. For some reason it has been very slow to get going but the structure and leaves are very nice.17_04_19_5318Another flash of gold from Sambucus racemosa Sutherland Gold 

Do have a look at Christina of My Hesperides Garden where she encourages us to look at the foliage in our garden rather than focusing on the flowers on the 22nd of each month. You will find links to other participating gardens there. Thank you Christina for hosting this meme.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
30 751 17

An Afternoon in two Hoby Gardens

12.00pm – 5.00pm on Wednesday 14th June
Hoby , Leicestershire, LE14 3DR

£5 includes entrance to gardens plus tea & cake, Fizz available at extra cost

 ~~ Redwood ~~

Main Street, Hoby, LE14 3DT  plus cake, tea & fizz

 ~~ Glebe House ~~

Church Lane, Hoby, LE14 3DR

 All proceeds to All Saints Church Hoby maintenance fund.

See map of location of Hoby . If you can get to this event I am sure you will enjoy the afternoon.

 

Spring up close

Spring has certainly progressed this last few days with some warm 16c sunshine. You can almost see the plants (and weeds) growing. Although I do not have a macro lens I thought I would share with you some “up close” images of the flowers making their presence know.17_03_15_5092The spring standby, Primrose (Primula vulgaris). Not really a plant that is planted as it is quite happy to plant itself. April 19th is traditionally Primrose Day, marking the death of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli on April 19th, 1881 when Queen Victoria sent primroses to his funeral.17_03_15_5083The radiant yellow flowers of dwarf Narcissus Tête á Tête give a big splash of colour to any bed. One drawback is that the leaves take time to disappear so I plant them towards the back of my borders where the leaves can die back out of sight.17_03_15_5084Mahonia media Charity looking splendid. Mahonia, or Oregon grape are highly prized not just for the beautiful glossy foliage, but because they flower through the winter months.17_03_15_5088Ipheion uniflorum White Star is a small herbaceous perennial growing from a bulb and producing flat, shiny, green, hairless, grasslike leaves up to 30 cm (12 in) long. The stem grows up to 20 cm (8 in) tall and bears a solitary showy flower in spring. Not such a  common spring flower but easy to grow in a sunny position. Here they underplant some roses.17_03_15_5079The first tulip flower of the season. Variety unknown! However, the tulips are coming up all over the garden so we are expecting an excellent display later on.17_03_15_5089Anemone Blanda Atrocoeruleais a very free flowering Anemone, which quickly forms large clumps and multiplies year after year. Plant under trees for a woodland effect, with a carpet of violet-blue flowers appearing every spring. The blue is stunning.17_03_15_5090and Anemone Blanda White Splendour tends to flower a little later but is just as useful in the spring border.17_03_15_5081Prunus Kojo-no-mai is always early to flower17_03_15_5082and looks great for no effort.17_03_16_5097Ribes sanguineum White Icicle has also started flowering.17_03_15_5095This Aubretia, in a warm spot has burst into flower.17_03_15_5094Lastly the view over the garden fence where the lambs are continuing to grow.

The first lawn mowing of the season took place this week and there has been much time spent removing self set alliums.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
20 609 16