End of the Month View – January 2018

Its the end of January and for one reason and another I have hardly done any gardening this year. We were away for five weeks travelling in Laos in December which was great but while we were away lots of little admin jobs seem to stack up waiting to be done. I will do some travel blogs on Laos shortly now that I have got the list of jobs done.

Before we went away we had a concentrated tidy up of the garden. Thank goodness we did as the weather has not been great since we got back with snow, frosts and rain and even more rain! As a result there are lots of gardening jobs waiting to be done and February is going to be very busy!18_01_29_8456This was one of the rare bits of sunshine looking across the garden and I will be honest in this photo it looks almost identical to the November EoMV18_01_29_8458But looking a little closer we can see many alliums and tulips already making considerable growth.18_01_29_8459Similarly in this bed but it also highlights the climbing roses that will need to be tamed in February. (I know it is a bit late but I am sure they will survive.)18_01_29_8457Elsewhere spring bulbs are starting to put on a show. This bed is largely snowdrops and aconites.  18_01_29_8464Here the snowdrops and aconites mingle with some really beautiful Cyclamens (variety not known) and an Iris Histrioides Katherine Hodgkin. This really is the essence of spring.18_01_29_8461This bed is more designed with Yew balls under planted with Hakonechloa macra. In spring clumps of snowdrops come up to extend the interest in the bed.18_01_29_8462Aconites and Iris Reticualata bring real colour to the spring beds.18_01_29_8463As I said we have had some very hard frosts, -7 c at times and the Euphorbia ‘Mellifera’, a plant that has marginal hardiness in this area has not enjoyed the cold. I think it will be OK but has certainly been knocked back a bit.

17_03_23_5108Other jobs completed have been the potting up of around 80 dahlia tubers. These had been drying out in our garage but have now been potted up in potting compost and are crowding into the green house. The above photograph is from 2017 but you get the idea. Around the end of February I will start watering them and with any luck they will produce great plants for planting out around the end of May when the frosts should have finished. In addition there has been more clearing some of the dried herbaceous plants from last year.

17_05_31_5882For those of you who remember this huge Crambe Cordifolia we said at the time that although it looks spectacular it was crowding everything out and we planned to move it. Well that was one of the jobs we have done so we can cross it off the list! The roots were over 60cm but I have replanted it elsewhere and I expect it to sulk for a year and then take off again.

18_01_29_8460The five new trees of Sorbus aucuparia ‘Autumn Spire’ also arrived and needed planting in the area behind the high wall. This almost completes the Design Challenge I mention last year and I will do a blog on this later in the year.

2018 Gardening Hours
Week beginning Jan 20th Total 2018 to-date Average per week
12 30 10

Given that last year we did on average 19 hours a week you can see we are well down on that!

Some of you will know that I took on the EoMV blog from Helen Johnstone last year. Helen is now back from her break from blogging and would like to take back the hosting of the EoMV which she had been doing since March 2009. So, if you would like to join in with the End of Month View please do. I suggest you add a link to your post in the comments below and also visit Helen and do the same there. Thank you for supporting the EoMV while I “baby sat” it and please come back to Glebe House Garden as often as you wish.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2017

Just four week since the April Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day and what a difference. Spring has gone and we are now into summer although the weather has yet to fully realise that!17_05_13_5700The first wave of aliums are looking splendid throughout the garden.17_05_14_571817_05_14_5724These have been in for many years and over time have multiplied to the extent we are having to reduce them despite their displays at this time of year.17_05_13_5696These are actually killing off the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter!17_05_10_5686nevertheless the alium flower is a thing of beauty.17_05_10_5687And whats left of the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter is too.

17_05_14_5713This is Rosa Madame Gregoire Staechlin and is normally the first rose to flower in our garden but not this year as Rosa Old Blush China started flowering on April 8th!

17_05_10_5683

Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

17_05_14_5712

Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

17_05_13_5710Another rose in flower is Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere.

17_05_10_5663

Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere

17_05_13_5691Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere is on the end wall beneath our conservatory from where we can also see a fantastic display of wisteria.17_05_10_5667Wisteria seems to have been very successful all around the area we live in which must have been helped by the lack of hard frosts this year.17_05_14_5725The scent from these flowers permeates into the house and is a delight.17_05_10_566617_05_10_5665 Below the wisteria a  Choisya ternata  which is in also in flower.17_05_13_5695Actually this plant has been moving itself. Originally it was planted under the steps leading up to the conservatory. It obviously decided it needed more light and over time has moved!17_05_14_5714We have a number of hardy osteospermums in the garden. These have come through the winter well and are already putting on a good display.17_05_10_568017_05_14_5719However, we always have a backup by taking cutting and bringing them on in the greenhouse. 17_05_14_5716Cerinthe major Purpurascens is not really hardy for us although sometimes they self seed and come through the winter as this one has.17_05_14_5717but there are also replacements in the greenhouse should they not self seed.17_05_14_5721Clematis have started flowering. This is  Clematis Daniel Deronda,17_05_13_5701and this is Clematis Guernsey Cream.17_05_14_5723One of the first geraniums to flower is Geranium himalayense with a Potentilla Abbotswood in the background.

Potentilla Abbotswood and Potentilla notknown.

The pond Iris sibirica looking great in front of the yellow Philadelphus coronarius Aureus.

Another early geranium is Geranium renardii. This is quite an unusual geranium with interesting foliage as well as attractive flowers.17_05_10_5674Deutzia x rosea Carminea a relatively new addition to the garden.17_05_13_5702Global warming means this Euphorbia Mellifera is able to grow and do well now in our garden.17_05_13_5698One of the climbing roses Rosa Shot Silk has started to flower.17_05_14_5727This is a beautiful rose but does not repeat well.

And I have added all the photos below.  Click on any one to scroll through them all. It is also possible to see them full size by clicking on the full size button (bottom right).

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
13 791 17

End of the Month View – October 2016

16_10_26_3589It is quite amazing how little has changed over the last 9 weeks since the EoMV for August. The shadows are getting longer and we move our clocks one hour back this week end with the end of summer time so the evening really will get dark quickly. We have had no frost yet so all of the more tender plants continue to shine. Actually there are more dahlias in flower now.16_10_26_3596The Dahlia Twyning’s After Eight has produced so many flowers despite a lack of dead heading (I had assumed that any day now the tubers would be going into store for the winter so deadheading would not be worth doing!).16_10_26_3603Similarly Dahlia Bishop Of Llandaff and Dahlia Bishop of Auckland16_10_26_3608Bishop of Auckland is a lovely dahlia. It has velvety, crimson, single flowers on near-black stems, in contrast with dark green-red leaves. As the flowers age the edge of the petals have an almost incandescent blue tinge.16_10_26_360516_10_26_3591Dahlia David Howard also continues to perform.16_10_26_3604Looking back towards our house along the south west facing border. In places plants are looking dry and finished but the sheer number of flowers is incredible.16_10_26_3595From the same spot looking to the south west16_10_26_3606A sign of the days moving towards winter when Cosmos Purity gets too large and falls over but it is still flowering.16_10_26_3599There are seed heads everywhere. Here the seed head from an Agapanthus.16_10_26_3602And here the dried up remains of Miss Wilmott’s Ghost with very nice grasses behind. We grow these from seed but unfortunately did not record what they were!16_10_26_3597A corner of the pergola with Eucomis in the foreground and Euphorbia mellifera  in the background.16_10_26_3592Many roses continue to flower. This is Rosa Mutablis which has now been flowering since last May. Mutablis illustrates the typical China rose trait of darkening with age, instead of fading. Single petals open sulfur yellow, changing through orange to a rich pink and finally crimson. Bright, silky flowers of all these colors will often be on display at the same time, looking as if a group of multi-colored butterflies has settled on the bush. This aspect earned Mutabilis its common name–”The Butterfly Rose”. 08_06_16_2673Rosa Mutablis last May, six months of beautiful flowers.16_10_26_3614Just as I was about to finish this blog there was a spectacular sunset. This photograph is taken from our conservatory (see photograph above) and is looking across the garden towards the west. The old kitchen garden garden wall (1704) can be seen on the right. Originally it would have continues across the picture, to the left, where there is an arch and rose bed.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
32 400 21