Some stormy weather, summer delights and snakes!

Some of you will remember a blog in February 2017 when a storm took out part of an old apple tree in the middle of our garden. After much debate (thanks for your inputs) we decided to keep the remaining tree.

In June 2018 our friend pointed out that the apple tree had taken on the shape of a chicken.

Then last week the weather decided it could do another topiary job of the tree.

This time it really does look like the end. The tree , especially when the Rosa Rambling Rector was in flower, was an important focal point within the garden. So removing it will be sad but hopefully will open up new opportunities.

The apple tree was not the only casualty with Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’ being blown off the pergola although fortunately this was repairable.

The following summer delights in the garden

Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’
Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’
Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’
Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’
Clematis ‘Rhapsody’
Clematis ‘Rhapsody’
Clematis ‘Viola’
Clematis ‘Viola’
Clematis ‘Monte Cassino’
Clematis ‘Monte Cassino’

The clematis and roses are all doing well this year.

This corner always looks good in the summer with the pink Geranium palmatum, roses and delphiniums. Last autumn I added the posts at the back to provided support for Rosa ‘Iceberg’ and Rosa ‘New Dawn’ as they always got lost behind the flowers.

Rosa ‘New Dawn’ has been here for at least 30 years and is looking healthier than ever.

Rosa ‘Iceberg’ has been in for about ten years can now be seen.

Often mistaken for a Rose , Carpenteria californica at the back has been looking great, probably benefiting from the mild winter we had. The pink rose is Rosa ‘Irene Watts’

And now for the snakes.

The mild winter has certainly helped the grass snake population. As soon as the sun comes out you can find them in the garden. This beauty was taking an early morning swim in one of our ponds, probably after our fish for breakfast!

End of the Month View – March 2017

It is now the end of March and we are half way through Spring. Th snowdrops have faded but other spring delights are following.17_03_29_5132Here is my classic End of the Month View (January, October, September, August) Last January the beds looked empty. Now they are full of leaves with lots of tulips and alliums pushing up. Mostly it looks very green but on the right we can see some early tulips adding some colour. 17_03_29_5143Looking across the centre bed we can see more tulips putting on a great display. (Before you ask, these have been in for over 10 years and I have lost the reference to there name). At the back you can see a blue carpet under the rose bushes.17_03_24_5131The Anemone Blanda Atrocoerulea were planted last spring with the idea that they would provide interest under the roses at a time when rose bushes are very boring. 17_03_23_5115This is proving very successful. The leaves die back very quickly after flowering and can then be tidied up if required. Over time these will eventually grow to form a complete carpet of blue.17_03_29_5134The bed to the left of the lawn is full to bursting with tulips and alliums and should look fantastic in a few weeks time. (Actually a gardening group will be visiting then) 17_03_29_5135However, looking at it I think we need to give some more thought to structure and colour at this time of year.17_03_29_5136To the right of the pond there is a similar mass of tulips and alliums. At the back the Delphinium Black KnightClematis Jackmanii, and Clematis Viola are all making good growth.17_03_29_5138To the right of the pond Tulip Apricot Impression is opening up. 17_03_29_5139Tulip Apricot Impression in all its glory. A very nice reasonable priced tulip.

At the back left of the bed you can see some plastic which covers Peach Terrace Amber Dwarf. This is to protect the peach from peach leaf curl.17_03_24_5130Under the plastic the peach is already in flower.17_03_29_5140Further round the bed on the right the Crown imperial fritillary is also flowering.

17_03_29_5145Elsewhere in the garden the plum Prunus Jubilee is flowering so far avoiding any frost damage.17_03_29_5146

Just how nice can spring get!

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
28 649 16

This week we spent considerable time in the garden. What were we doing?17_03_23_5112For example here is our strawberry bed which is down wind from a big sycamore tree. You can see that this is covered with small seedlings from the tree.  It takes time to remove them by hand. Just one of the jobs to be done.

Do have a look at Helen The Patient Gardener’s blog where you fill find links to other gardens at the end of March. Thank you to Helen for hosting this meme.

also Sarah at Down By The Sea for Through The Garden Gate (here).

Art and Alliums

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Back home after a week and a half away and it is not looking too bad. However, there is work to be done. The lawn never stops growing and needed a good cut.

06_07_16_2770

It is not looking too bad although speedwell continues to be the main weed which is very hard to eliminate. Any suggestions?

We had arranged for the Hoby Art Group to spend some time in the garden. 13641192_10154394986859575_7592941501705427053_o

Looking at the yew hedge in the centre I can see some more work required!

Clematis of the week:

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Clematis Viola making a fantastic display and this plant is only three years old!

_MG_1313 Alliums can look fantastic. Here typical mixtures of Alliums with Rosa ‘Shot Silk’ on the wall.  07_07_16_2784The issue in our garden is that they love to self seed so although the seed heads can look great we have to remove them before they seed.07_07_16_2786

It has rained on several days so not so much time in the garden!

Gardening hours
This week Since June 19th
12 16