Aconites and others spring delights

After snowdrops Eranthis hyemalis winter aconites are one of the delights of spring. This woodland member of the buttercup family will swiftly multiply to form a glowing carpet of golden yellow flowers each spring. The cup shaped blooms of the winter aconite attract pollinating insects into the spring garden, and associate beautifully with snowdrops and bluebells for a spectacular woodland display. Virtually maintenance free, Eranthis hyemalis are ideal for planting in the dappled shade of deciduous trees, or naturalised in informal areas of grass.

However, I have found from experience they are hard to establish. The cheapest way to buy them is as small tubers but I have not had much success planting these directly in the borders. Maybe I was just feeding the mice but they seldom came up! However, I have found that planting in pots of compost in the autumn and leaving in a cool greenhouse is generally successful. 17_02_22_4980On the right the Winter Aconites and on the left  Anemone Blanda White Splendour which I treat in the same way. An additional benefit of this approach is that the greenhouse gets full of the scent of the Winter Aconites which is fantastic.

17_03_04_5026The border with the snowdrops beginning to fade.

17_03_04_5027The winter aconites ready for planting

17_03_04_5028The border now with a few splashes of yellow which will establish themselves into large clumps over the next few years.

Other spring delights

17_03_04_5031Everywhere you look at this time of year spring bulbs are bursting out.17_03_04_5032Crocus Pickwick coming back every year.

17_03_04_5035Borders of Helleborus Ashwoods Hybrids doing their own thing.17_03_04_5036

 

17_03_04_5037Crocus Joan of Arc under a row of step-over apples with tulips emerging behind.17_03_04_5038What could be more wonderful!

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
15 589 16

Lambs and snowdrops

 

17_03_01_5009Spring had really arrived now. Over the years we have been splitting clumps of snowdrops to fill out the border down the lefthand side of the garden. This has been a real success with the spring bed looking absolutely gorgeous.  17_03_01_502317_03_01_5007From our back door the border is raised and you find yourself looking into the snowdrops.Which is really great to see.17_03_01_5024Looking down on the same part of the bed you can see the progress the tulips are making. These are mainly Red Impression and by April the whole of this left hand border will be full of Red Impression.17_02_22_4982The beauty of spring comes through with snowdrops, aconites,  Iris Histrioides Katherine Hodgkin and a small cyclamen. 17_03_01_5012Elsewhere the snowdrops set of the yew and box hedging.

17_03_01_5017The other arrival this week are the lambs in the field below our garden. The lambs are born in lambing sheds so when they are put out to the field they are quite strong. However, the day they arrived it turned cold and rained and I guess they wondered what it was all about. Certainly we could hear a significant amount of lambs crying out through the night.17_03_01_5016In a week or two they will be charging around the field like a group of adolescents!

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
16 574 16

All 16 hours were on the clean up following Doris. In particular, Diane did 10 hours of shredding so that we can recycle all the brushwood back into the compost heap through the year ahead. The shreddings have been bagged up and are ready to be moved to the compost area.