Some stormy weather, summer delights and snakes!

Some of you will remember a blog in February 2017 when a storm took out part of an old apple tree in the middle of our garden. After much debate (thanks for your inputs) we decided to keep the remaining tree.

In June 2018 our friend pointed out that the apple tree had taken on the shape of a chicken.

Then last week the weather decided it could do another topiary job of the tree.

This time it really does look like the end. The tree , especially when the Rosa Rambling Rector was in flower, was an important focal point within the garden. So removing it will be sad but hopefully will open up new opportunities.

The apple tree was not the only casualty with Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’ being blown off the pergola although fortunately this was repairable.

The following summer delights in the garden

Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’
Rosa ‘Madame Gregoire Staechlin’
Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’
Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’
Clematis ‘Rhapsody’
Clematis ‘Rhapsody’
Clematis ‘Viola’
Clematis ‘Viola’
Clematis ‘Monte Cassino’
Clematis ‘Monte Cassino’

The clematis and roses are all doing well this year.

This corner always looks good in the summer with the pink Geranium palmatum, roses and delphiniums. Last autumn I added the posts at the back to provided support for Rosa ‘Iceberg’ and Rosa ‘New Dawn’ as they always got lost behind the flowers.

Rosa ‘New Dawn’ has been here for at least 30 years and is looking healthier than ever.

Rosa ‘Iceberg’ has been in for about ten years can now be seen.

Often mistaken for a Rose , Carpenteria californica at the back has been looking great, probably benefiting from the mild winter we had. The pink rose is Rosa ‘Irene Watts’

And now for the snakes.

The mild winter has certainly helped the grass snake population. As soon as the sun comes out you can find them in the garden. This beauty was taking an early morning swim in one of our ponds, probably after our fish for breakfast!

Berberis koreana (Korean Barberry) ‘Red Tears’ an excellent plant with four seasons.

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September 27th

Ever so often a chance purchase of a shrub gives a pleasant surprise.  Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ was one such purchase and it is certainly worth considering for any garden.

Berberis, commonly known as barberry, is a large genus of deciduous and evergreen shrubs from 1–5 m tall found throughout the temperate and subtropical regions of the world. Extremely hardy, Berberis koreana (Korean Barberry) is certainly one to consider for almost any garden. Berberis koreana grows with a dense, oval to rounded habit, at a moderate rate, up to 4-6 ft/120-180 cm tall and wide. It performs best in full sun to part shade, in dry to moist, well-drained soils and is not fussy about soils provided they are not soggy or wet. The main Berberis koreana cultivar is ‘Red Tears’

Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ will give four seasons of interest:-

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April 17th

This semi-evergreen shrub is native to the Korean peninsula and Japan. Its bark is reddish brown and the twigs are densely armed with short spines in groups of one to five. At this stage the main interest are the very crisp green leaves.

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April 25th

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April 25th

In mid-spring, this small, multi-stemmed. semi-evergreen shrub produces striking pendulous clusters of golden-yellow flowers. At this stage the flowers are beginning to hang in clusters but are not fully open. The leaves are also getting a red tint to their edges

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May 10th

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May 10th

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May 13th

By now the flowers are fully open and have quite a “honey” scent which fills the still evening air.

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August 19th

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August 19th

The flowers are followed by an abundance of tiny oval fruits which at this stage are yellow tinged with red.

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August 25th

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August 28th

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August 28th

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August 28th

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August 28th

The fruits ripen to bright red by the fall and are attractive to birds.

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September 27th

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September 27th

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October 9th

and then persist across the winter. Therefore extending the season of interest of this ornamental shrub.

Overall Berberis koreana  ‘Red Tears’ is an excellent shrub giving year round interest with virtually no maintenance.

Other points to consider:

Pro:

Fairly pest-free, easy to grow and to care for. Light pruning may be required to maintain a lovely shape. Drought tolerant and  deer resistant, what more could you wish for!

Perfect choice as a single specimen plant or massed in borders, for foundation plantings or as an informal barrier, screen or hedge.

Against:

The shrub can sucker from the roots and form colonies

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day – October 2017

It is the middle of October, in two weeks we will put the clocks back at the end of summer time. The evening will be dark and we will feel winter is really here.

For this GBBD I decided to walk around taking photos of the various blooms that are still out.  If you had asked me before the walk I would have thought maybe a dozen good blooms. How wrong I was! Here are the photos I took (and there could have been more!)

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Salvia ‘Cerro Potosi’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

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Rosa ‘Alister Stella Grey’

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Rosa ‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’

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Rosa ’Wildeve’

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Rosa ‘Lichfield Angel’

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa ‘Bonica’

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Rosmarinus officianalis horizontalis

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Ricinus communis ‘Impala’

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Anemone ‘Honorine Joubert’

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Clematis ‘Ville de Lyon’

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Cyclamen Self set hardy variety

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Clematis ‘Jackmanii’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Cosmos ‘Versailles tetra’

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Aster ‘Starshine’

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Dahlia David Howard

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Rosa ‘Queen of Sweden’

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Clematis ‘Lady Betty Balfour’

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Rudbeckia ‘Rustic Dwarfs Mixed’

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Rudbeckia x Hirta Hybrida Cherokee Sunset

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Helianthemum ‘Ben Fhada’

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Phlox paniculata Uspekh

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Verbena bonariensis

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Aconitum x cammarum ‘Bicolor’

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Achillea ‘Credo’

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Rosa ‘Ghislaine de Feligonde’

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Osteospermum ‘Tresco Purple’

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Rudbeckia ‘Herbstone’

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Aster praealtus

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Rosa ‘Shot Silk’

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Rosa ‘Awakening’

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Dahlia ‘Twyning’s After Eight’

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Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’

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Achillea millefolium ‘Terracotta’

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Coreopsis ‘Redshift’

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Clematis ‘Chelsea’

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Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’

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Rosa ‘Crown Princess Margareta’

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Rosa ‘Blush Noisette’

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Salvia involocruta bethellii

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Dahlia Bishop of Auckland

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Sedum ‘not known’

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Cerastostigma willmottianum ‘Forest Blue’

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Dahlia Bishop of Llandaff

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Geranium riversleaianum ‘Mavis Simpson’

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning
October 7th
Total 2017 to-date Average per week
33 847 21

 

Some stars in the August border

It is mid August already and the garden and weather is beginning to feel more like Autumn. July gave us some really nice summer weather but this August has been poor so far. We have had more than half the normal rainfall in the first two weeks and it seems that the jet stream is in the wrong place such that even when high pressure is in control the air is very humid and the sky is overcast. Never the less most plants are performing and here is a selection from the garden in August.17_08_19_6842Rudbeckia ‘Herbstone’ grows to almost two metres at the back of the border but does need staking to stop it falling on other plants.

Butterflies have been plentiful in the garden this year.  Here on a variety of plants. We do have a Butterfly bush Buddleja davidii which of course gets covered with butterflies too.17_08_06_6815This circular bed (stone edged bed on the garden map) was newly planted in 2016 and one of the things I was trying to achieve was a succession of plants forming a snake through the centre. Here Anemone ‘Wild Swan’ is achieving the snake with the leaves of Brunnera ‘Mr. Morse’ also snaking through.17_08_10_6823Rudbeckia fulgida sullivantii ‘Goldsturm’ should always have a place in the August border.17_08_19_6839At first this looked like a new plant formed when a Perovskia ‘Blue Spire’ decided to climb up a Foeniculum vulgare ‘purpureum’17_08_10_6824I always grow some Ricinus communis ‘Impala’ from seed each year starting them off in the greenhouse and planting out when the dahlias go in. The leaves are fantastic architectural additions to any border but note that they  donot overwinter here. 17_08_19_6837There are many different Dahlias in our garden This is one of my favorites, Dahlia ‘Bishop of Aukland’.17_08_10_6826This is Phlox paniculata Uspekh a plant I saw on a garden visit and just had to have for its strong colours.17_08_10_6830Colour combinations are important in the garden. Often it is the plants themselves which seem to combine in good ways. Here we have Achillea ‘Credo’ with Salvia greggii ‘Emperor’, as close to complementary colours as you can get.17_08_19_6836Here Helenium ‘Moerheim Beauty’ is absolutely stunning but look closely a Cerastostigma willmottianum ‘Forest Blue’ has got into the picture. Complementary colours again!

Hemerocallis ‘Lemon Bells’ has been a real success this year and has been flowering now for around 10 weeks.17_08_10_6832And other day lilies have also done well, here is Hemerocallis ‘Stafford’.17_08_19_6841A shrubby clematis, Clematis ‘Wyevale’, comes back every year and has a long flowering period.17_08_10_6831Cone flowers, Echinacea purpurea,  are loved by insects and look fantastic in the garden.

There is a huge range of salvias on the market. Recently I have been adding a couple each year. Here is Salvia x jamensis ‘Sierra san Antonio’ and Salvia microphylla ‘Icing Sugar’17_08_19_6848 Osteospermums have a long flowing period and look great. This is Osteospermum ‘Tresco Purple’ which is hardy in some places but so far not here so I take cuttings every year.17_08_19_6844Sowed a bit late but this Rudbeckia came from a packet of seed described as Rustic Dwarfs Mixed and has produced some stars. I will try getting Rudbeckia plants from seed every year now.17_08_19_6847Another plant from seed is Cosmos, this is Cosmos versailles tera and produces some very strongly coloured flowers.17_08_19_6851This is new to me, Maurandya ‘Magic Dragon’. Sue Turner at “from sewing room to potting shed” very kindly sent me some seed last year. 17_08_19_6850Another climber, Clematis ‘Jackmanii’, has been doing great things although this year has not produced the best from clematis which I suspect was due to lack of rain through the spring.17_08_19_6852Last but not least, Anemone ‘Honorine Joubert’, a great plant not least because it copes with shade well.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning
August 12th
Total 2017 to-date Average per week
10 671 20

Roses, Roses, Roses

This year the roses have been particularly good and this week I have featured some of the roses that were out today.

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Rosa ‘Jacques Cartier’

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Rosa ‘Bonica’

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A Noname but looks like a David Austin rose so some research required

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa Bobby James

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Rosa ‘Bonica’ as a standard rose

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa Iceberg

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Rosa ‘Eglantyne’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Empress Josephine’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Strawberry Hill’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa ‘Sombreuil’

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Rosa ‘Alfred de Dalmas’

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Rosa ‘Awakening’

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Rosa ‘Anne Boleyn’

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Rosa ‘Crocus Rose’

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Rosa Felicite Perpetue

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Rosa Felicite Perpetue

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Rose Ballerina

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Rosa ‘Joseph’s Coat’

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Rosa ‘A Shropshire Lad’

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Rosa ‘Kent’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

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Rosa ‘Phyllis Bide’

A photographic blog as we have been away and time is short.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning June 17th Total 2017 to-date Average per week
0 558 22

The wall across the lawn

We moved to Glebe House in September 1994. When people come around our garden they often ask us what the garden was like when we moved in. Actually some of the garden features were there then but over time they have all evolved and in some areas a small paddock has been incorporated into the garden.17_05_25_5840 The other day I noticed that the wall across the lawn was looking particularly good.This wall divides the main lawn and follows the contours of the ground resulting in the lawn being at two levels and although it does not align with other garden features it takes the eye into the garden towards the views beyond.img120This photo was actually taken in June 1995. As you can see the wall was in place then but was not really made a feature of the garden.17_05_24_5833We always felt the wall needed a good “full stop” at the end. As you can see above we have created a small round bed at the end with a Rosa Bonica providing the “stop”. You can also see that the wall is actually higher than the original wall. In the old photo the lawn edge actually sloped down to the top of the wall.img119Another photo from June 1995. The steps up had been built and these have not been changed apart from the flower beds around them and the lawn in the foreground is now paved with sandstone  The very large tree, back right, is an old walnut. We were very disappointed when it died and had to be removed about ten years ago.17_05_25_5839The steps today with the sand stone paving.17_05_24_5831As well as raising the height of the wall we have created a flower bed along the top of the wall. This is about one metre wide and at this time of year it really comes into its own.

In any dry stone wall then Aubrieta is an essential plant.

The rock rose, Helianthemum ‘The Bride’ has been looking great although just one day after these photos were taken there were no flowers on it. That was probably due to the heat which has unusually been at 28c for the last few days!

This is probably my favourite geranium, Geranium cenereum subcaulescens. It is a very dark cerise colour which really shines out from the green leaves. It is planted singularly along the wall but also on mass under Rosa Bonica at the end of the wall.17_05_24_5824Another geranium at the end of the wall is Geramium sanguineum ‘Shepherd’s Warning’. This was planted about eight years ago and although it looks quite healthy has not spread unlike some  of the other sanguineums that can be very invasive.

This plant was taken from a cutting in a friend’s garden. It is definitely a “noname” plant at the moment.17_05_24_5818Viola cornuta ‘Alba’ must have arrived from else where in the garden but it is working well here.17_05_24_5832Rosmarinus officinalis forms a small bushy shrub and provides Rosemary for cooking.

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Geramium sanguineum striatum

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Geramium sanguineum striatum

17_05_24_5812Geramium sanguineum striatum is a lovely geramium and here it is on either side of the steps.17_05_24_5817Geranium cinereum ‘Ballerina’ another small geranium.17_05_24_5819Another rock rose, Helianthemum ‘Ben Fhada’17_05_25_5838Along the wall from the steps.17_05_24_5831Looking the other way along the wall. Over the next few days we will be planting Mesembryanthemum ‘Magic Carpet’ which have been started in the greenhouse and will provided interest throughout the summer.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
51 885 17

Garden Blogger’s Foliage Day – May 2017

Foliage is everywhere now. At this time of year it is always new, fresh and clean. Last week we have had the first real rain this year, about 60mm in 48 hours, which has been great for the garden and has ensured all the leaves had been newly washed.17_05_21_5795Hostas catch the rain and look great.17_05_21_577017_05_21_5771Here a big leaf of Hosta Sun & Substance getting larger by the day.17_05_21_5808 A creeping thyme, growing in a planting pocket in the paving, is now covered with new small leaves. In four weeks it will turn purple with small flowers.17_05_21_5788Another herb, Oregano Origanum vulgare Aureum, has a wonderful yellow/green foliage and makes a great border plant as well as being useful for cooking.17_05_21_5791Arum italicum Pictum puts on a good display but this is short lived as the leaves disappear once it has flowered.17_05_21_5800Plume Poppy, Macleaya cordata, grows to about 2m and has the most delicate leaves.

Ferns continue to unwind their leaves17_05_21_5801and some just put out beautiful coloured leaves such as this Japanese Painted Fern, Athyrium nipponicum Pictum.17_05_21_5804These are the leaves of Geranium renardii and don’t they look great.17_05_21_5780Plenty of foliage but the purpose of the photo was to show the plants waiting to be put into the garden! As well as my dahlias, which have been hardened off before planting out, last Wednesday it rained and rained so what do gardeners do. We went to a good plant nursery and filled up the car with more plants!17_05_21_5782Dahlias in pots having been grown from tubers.17_05_21_5803And in the green house now the foliage of the future just staring out.17_05_21_5802Courgettes  waiting to be planted. Interesting the golden varieties also have gold leaves.

The gold foliage of Sambucus racemosa Sutherland GoldBerberis tunmbergii AureaPhysocarpus opulifolius Dart’s Gold and Euonymus fortunei Emerald ‘n’ Gold looks really great.

And the red foliage is not to be outdone! Heuchera ‘noname’, Berberis thumbergii ‘Red Chief’, Berberis thunbergii ‘Rose Glow’ and Acer palmatum dissectum.

The yew hedges have all put on new growth and look stunning.

Varigated foliage Euonymus fortunei ‘Emerald Gaiety’, Cornus alternifolia Argentea and Osmanthus heterophyllus variegatus also adds interest.17_05_21_5784The beautiful leaf of Rodgersia aesculifolia gets bigger as the year goes on.17_05_21_5783Lastly the new leaves on the pleached lime hedge are wonderful.

Do have a look at Christina of My Hesperides Garden where she encourages us to look at the foliage in our garden rather than focusing on the flowers on the 22nd of each month. You will find links to other participating gardens there. Thank you Christina for hosting this meme.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
28 832 17

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – May 2017

Just four week since the April Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day and what a difference. Spring has gone and we are now into summer although the weather has yet to fully realise that!17_05_13_5700The first wave of aliums are looking splendid throughout the garden.17_05_14_571817_05_14_5724These have been in for many years and over time have multiplied to the extent we are having to reduce them despite their displays at this time of year.17_05_13_5696These are actually killing off the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter!17_05_10_5686nevertheless the alium flower is a thing of beauty.17_05_10_5687And whats left of the Euphorbia griffithii Dixter is too.

17_05_14_5713This is Rosa Madame Gregoire Staechlin and is normally the first rose to flower in our garden but not this year as Rosa Old Blush China started flowering on April 8th!

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Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

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Rosa Madame Gregorie Staechlin

17_05_13_5710Another rose in flower is Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere.

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Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere

17_05_13_5691Rosa Madame Alfred Carriere is on the end wall beneath our conservatory from where we can also see a fantastic display of wisteria.17_05_10_5667Wisteria seems to have been very successful all around the area we live in which must have been helped by the lack of hard frosts this year.17_05_14_5725The scent from these flowers permeates into the house and is a delight.17_05_10_566617_05_10_5665 Below the wisteria a  Choisya ternata  which is in also in flower.17_05_13_5695Actually this plant has been moving itself. Originally it was planted under the steps leading up to the conservatory. It obviously decided it needed more light and over time has moved!17_05_14_5714We have a number of hardy osteospermums in the garden. These have come through the winter well and are already putting on a good display.17_05_10_568017_05_14_5719However, we always have a backup by taking cutting and bringing them on in the greenhouse. 17_05_14_5716Cerinthe major Purpurascens is not really hardy for us although sometimes they self seed and come through the winter as this one has.17_05_14_5717but there are also replacements in the greenhouse should they not self seed.17_05_14_5721Clematis have started flowering. This is  Clematis Daniel Deronda,17_05_13_5701and this is Clematis Guernsey Cream.17_05_14_5723One of the first geraniums to flower is Geranium himalayense with a Potentilla Abbotswood in the background.

Potentilla Abbotswood and Potentilla notknown.

The pond Iris sibirica looking great in front of the yellow Philadelphus coronarius Aureus.

Another early geranium is Geranium renardii. This is quite an unusual geranium with interesting foliage as well as attractive flowers.17_05_10_5674Deutzia x rosea Carminea a relatively new addition to the garden.17_05_13_5702Global warming means this Euphorbia Mellifera is able to grow and do well now in our garden.17_05_13_5698One of the climbing roses Rosa Shot Silk has started to flower.17_05_14_5727This is a beautiful rose but does not repeat well.

And I have added all the photos below.  Click on any one to scroll through them all. It is also possible to see them full size by clicking on the full size button (bottom right).

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
13 791 17

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day – April 2017

This is my first Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day. Those of you who have seen last weeks blog Tulip Mania will realise that we have hundreds of tulips in bloom so I decided that there would not be a tulip in sight this week. So here goes:17_04_11_5281The side of our house is very shaded and we really focus on ferns, hostas and rodgersia. The snowdrops are long over but we have planted Erythronium Pagoda commonly known as dog’s tooth violet ‘Pagoda’ due to the shape of the tuber.17_04_10_5249At this time of year there are plenty of leaves as well as the delightful flowers. 17_04_10_5252Once the flowers are over the leaves decay very quickly.

Another interesting plant collection for this time of year are Epimediums.17_04_06_5231 This one is Epimedium Akebono. 17_04_10_5254Here they have been planted beneath a standard rose in a planter. Planting like this was a bit experimental last year but so far it is looking good.17_04_10_5255and the flowers are delightful.

17_03_29_5142Elsewhere we have Epimedium x versiclour Sulphureum planted around the base of a tree. This seems to work very well in an area which is often dry and shaded.17_03_29_5141Lastly we have 17_04_03_5195which is one of those plants that we were given without a name. On the RHS website there are 384 different varieties of Epimedium so there is plenty to consider.

17_04_07_5237In this circular bed we have created a ribbon of plants going through the middle. Over the spring these change from Iris Reticualata, to Anemone Blanda White Splendour, to Brunnera Mr. Morse now and in the future Tulip Hageri Splendens (sorry I used the tulip word but they are not out yet!) and then Anemone Wild Swan. 17_04_10_5260Brunnera Mr. Morse is a very nice Brunnera, similar to Brunnera Jack Frost but with dainty white flowers.

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17_04_10_5257This time a shrub; Viburnum carlesii Diana .17_04_10_5258The scent from these flowers is outstanding.

17_04_10_5259Fruit trees are in blossom everywhere. This is a Morello Cherry which is considered the best sour cooking cherry for the UK.

and lots more spring delights.

Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day is hosted on the 15th of each month by Carol at May Dreams Gardens. Visit her blog to see what is blooming in gardens around the world.

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
42 721 17

This was our busiest week since June. Luckily we had some fantastic weather with temperatures up to 25c. That’s summer not spring but I am not complaining. Most of the work has been weeding and tidying up the borders in readiness for summer.

Tulip Mania

News flash: The first swallows arrived on April 3rd

Tulip Mania

17_04_05_5209Tulips have really come out this week. For many years we have planted Tulip Red Impression all along the left hand border to our garden. It is hard to get the effect in one photograph but standing looking at the display with the sunlight shining across the flowers is just magical. Most of them come up each year but we look for any gaps and replenish them. Probably we plant around 100 extra Red impression each year plus many other tulips and bulbs. See blog with bulb list.17_04_03_5197Looking along the same border. There is a small cobble path running through this part of the border although it is covered in twigs from the tree above (another job waiting to be done).17_04_03_5192The same border with Anemone Blanda Atrocoerulea and Leucojum Aestivum 17_04_03_5193 Leucojum Aestivum which resembles a snowdrop but is much larger. Worth a space in any garden.17_04_03_5196Looking from the back of the same border.17_04_03_5188Another part of the same border.17_04_03_5183Tulip Turkestanica a species of tulip native to central Asia. It was first described by Eduard August von Regel in 1873 as a variety of T. sylvestris, then elevated to full species status two years later.17_04_03_5184Tulip Turkestanica on the edge of the “Dingly Dell” border which is actually at the back of the Japanese border.17_04_07_5240Another tulip species, Tulip Humilis17_04_06_5214Tulip Ballerina lining the path to the pergola with Tulip Apricot Impression in the background.

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Tulip Ballerina

17_04_06_5212Close up of the lovely Tulip Ballerina 17_04_07_5242Sitting under the pergola looking towards the corner bed. Tulip Gavota in the foreground.

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Tulip Gavota

17_04_07_5243From the pergola across the main lawn with Tulip Ballerina in the foreground.

17_04_06_5218Tulip Ad Rem at the back of the corner bed. When the sun comes out Tulip Ad Rem really fluoresces.

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Tulip Ad Ram

17_04_03_5172Tulip Apricot Impression together with many alliums.

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Tulip Apricot Impression

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Tulip Apricot Impression

17_04_03_5181Tulip Purissima (white) and Tulip Beauty Queen (pink) both plant in 2007

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Tulip Indian Summer and Tulip Annie Schilder

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Tulip Annie Schilder with Tulip Indian Summer in the background

17_04_07_5236Tulip Indian Summer and it has a wonderful perfume a bit like wallflowers.17_04_07_5247A final view across to the border full of Tulip Red Impression with the evening shadows across the lawn.

News flash: First rose in bloom!

17_04_07_5244As I walked back to the house I noticed that Rosa Old Blush China had started flowering

Gardening Hours
This week Total since June 19th Average per week
30 679 16