Wild flower meadow project update (August)

Things have certainly moved on since this project started. We now have a fence (except for the field gate which should arrive this week). The lime tree in the picture has had its canopy raised so I can walk under it. This should create a dappled shade enabling wild flowers to grow under the tree. In the recent exceptionally hot spell (34c) it also provided one of the coolest parts of our garden!

The major and exhausting job has been cutting the existing grass and scarification to expose the soil prior to seeding.

The grass was first cut as short as possible. Even then there remained a lot of thatch as these fields have been a sheep meadow for several hundred years. Then my little scarifier has done the work to cut into the thatch and pull it up.

The thatch then needs to be raked up.

Without the right machine this is very much a manual job and quite exhausting it is too!

The thatch is beginning to loosen up so that when we seed the seed can make contact with the soil and hopefully germinate.

Interestingly although we have only brought about 26m into the field we do seem much closer to the pond. This pond was the fish pond for the rectory next door. It is therefore at least 300 years old and could have been a medieval fish pond. The level is maintained by a small weir on the stream which runs along the edge of the field.

So far I have scarified the whole field in one direction. Now I need to do the same in the other direction!

Right from the start we decided to get some mature trees. A visit to Majestic Trees and we now have three trees on order. A Liquidambar styraciflua

A Fagus sylvatica ‘Tricolour’ and

a Crataegus laevigata ‘Paul’s Scarlet’. These trees will be planted in October when we should expect more rain. As you can see from the pictures they are on extensive watering systems.

Lastly we now have brought the meadow seed. We were fortunate to have a long established wild flower seed supplier near us called Naturescape. Discussions with them certainly helped us choose the seed. We have gone for three different seed mixes:

The ditch which forms the ha-ha at the edge of the garden is always going to be damp and we have gone for Wetland Meadow Mixture:

Latin NameEnglish NameMix Composition
Achillea millefoliumYarrow2.50%
Centaurea nigraCommon Knapweed9%
Filipendula ulmariaMeadowsweet8%
Lathyrus pratensisMeadow Vetchling3%
Leucanthemum vulgareOxeye Daisy7%
Lotus corniculatusBirdsfoot Trefoil4%
Lotus pedunculatusGreater Birdsfoot Trefoil4%
Lychnis flos-cuculiRagged Robin2%
Ononis repensCommon Restharrow2%
Plantago lanceolataRibwort Plantain4%
Primula verisCowslip3%
Prunella vulgarisSelf Heal8%
Ranunculus acrisMeadow Buttercup9%
Rhinanthus minorYellow Rattle10%
Rumex acetosaCommon Sorrel8%
Sanguisorba officinalisGreat Burnet2%
Serratula tinctoriaSawwort1%
Stachys officinalisBetony2.50%
Succisa pratensisDevilsbit Scabious3.50%
Tragopogon pratensisGoatsbeard2%
Trifolium pratenseWild Red Clover3%
Vicia craccaTufted Vetch3%

The areas under the Lime tree and the Horse Chestnut tree will always be dry and we have been advised that a Hedgerow Meadow Mixture would work well there:

Latin NameEnglish NameMix Composition
Achillea millefoliumYarrow3%
Agrimonia eupatoriaCommon Agrimony4%
Alliaria petiolataGarlic Mustard7%
Centaurea nigraCommon Knapweed6%
Digitalis purpureaWild Foxglove3%
Filipendula ulmariaMeadowsweet4%
Galium mollugoHedge Bedstraw4%
Geranium pyrenaicumHedgerow Cranesbill1%
Geum urbanumWood Avens5%
Hypericum perforatumCommon St. John’s Wort2%
Knautia arvensisField Scabious4%
Lathyrus pratensisMeadow Vetchling3%
Leontodon autumnalisAutumn Hawkbit2%
Leucanthemum vulgareOxeye Daisy5%
Malva moschataMusk Mallow5%
Malva sylvestrisCommon Mallow4%
Prunella vulgarisSelf Heal5%
Silene albaWhite Campion5%
Silene dioicaRed Campion7%
Silene vulgarisBladder Campion2%
Stachys sylvaticaHedge Woundwort6%
Torilis japonicaUpright Hedge Parsley4%
Verbascum nigrumDark Mullein3%
Vicia craccaTufted Vetch5%
Vicia sylvaticaWood Vetch1%

And for the bulk of the field a Summer Flowering Butterfly & Bee Meadow Mixture:

Latin NameEnglish NameMix Composition
Achillea millefoliumYarrow3%
Anthyllis vulnerariaKidney Vetch3%
Campanula glomerataClustered Bellflower1%
Campanula tracheliumNettle Leaved Bellflower1%
Centaurea nigraCommon Knapweed8%
Centaurea scabiosaGreater Knapweed5%
Daucus carotaWild Carrot4%
Echium vulgareViper’s Bugloss4%
Galium verumLady’s Bedstraw8%
Geranium pratenseMeadow Cranesbill2%
Hypericum perforatumCommon St. John’s Wort3%
Knautia arvensisField Scabious5%
Lathyrus pratensisMeadow Vetchling3%
Linaria vulgarisCommon Toadflax1%
Lotus corniculatusBirdsfoot Trefoil7%
Lythrum salicariaPurple Loosestrife2%
Origanum vulgareWild Marjoram2%
Prunella vulgarisSelf Heal10%
Rhinanthus minorYellow Rattle7%
Scabiosa columbariaSmall Scabious4%
Stachys officinalisBetony4%
Stachys sylvaticaHedge Woundwort3%
Succisa pratensisDevilsbit Scabious2%
Trifolium pratenseWild Red Clover3%
Verbascum nigrumDark Mullein2%
Vicia craccaTufted Vetch3%

In addition we added some seed of Cowslips, Oxeye Daisy, Greater Hawbit, Salard Burnet and Pignut. We will probably seed the area around the end of August.

One unexpected benefit of the meadow is it gives us another view into our garden.

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11 thoughts on “Wild flower meadow project update (August)

  1. What a project! It’s going to be an amazing area when things grow in, and I’m sure they shall do that rather quickly.
    I love meadows. I think you’ll really enjoy having this one so close by to enjoy and observe as it changes through the seasons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We hope so. At the moment it is hard work. My main concern is that the existing grass may be too vigorous. I have will sow extra Yellow Rattle to reduce the vigor.

      Like

  2. When I see that picture of you walking through tall grass I get itchy. Do you have chiggers in your grasslands? I sure hope not.
    I laughed when you said you trimmed the tree limbs up so you could walk under the tree. If anyone strolls through my garden I hope they are my height 5’6″ or less because that is where I trim up tree limbs, just enough so I don’t get conked on the head when walking through the garden.
    So much work for the meadow. I can’t wait to see it abloom.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a fabulous project. Lots of hard work, but will really be worth it. Can’t wait to see the field in full wild flower mode. Love the trees too. Good choices. Good company. We’ve had many from them. All have done well. Love karen x

    Liked by 1 person

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