End of Month View – October 2017

October in the centre of England has been a strange month. The temperature has continued to be above average and the plants have continued to flower. It is definitely autumn with the leaves turning and dropping, all the more so with several windy periods as a couple of Atlantic storms have arrived. We are towards the east of the country so even these storms have normally moderated by the time they get to us.

17_10_28_7426My regular view across the garden. There are still many flowers out although not as many as last month. We have not had any frost so far so the dahlias are continuing to flower. One of the negative aspect of the warm and damp weather through September and October has been the growth of moss in the lawns. 17_10_29_7433This time of year is a good time for scarification to remove any thatch and moss in the lawn. It always amazes me how much can come up with such a small machine and this is after the lawns have been cut with the normal mower.17_10_28_7425Its a labour intensive job. After the scarification the thatch needs to be raked into piles.17_10_28_7427Bagged up ready to be moved around to the composting area. Then the lawn need mowing again to pick any lose material not raked up. Thank goodness it is only once a year.17_10_29_7434Elsewhere a sure sign that winter is on the way is when we start to wrap the benches in the garden.17_10_29_7442However, the roses continue to flower. This is mostly Rosa ‘Lichfield Angel’17_10_29_7437and Rosa ‘Souvenir de la Malmaison’ which also needs its winter prune to get it back into shape.17_10_29_7439Pruning climbing roses is a significant job at this time of year. This will more or less need to be taken off the wall and rearranged but………..17_05_13_5698……….see how it will look in May. Rosa ‘Shot Silk’ is the rose.

One of the stars this autumn has been Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’ which continues to look fantastic.17_10_29_7441View across the lawn with Salvia ‘Phyllis Fancy’  either side of the pond.

It is getting into bulb planting time. We do not lift our tulips as most come back each year but over time they do need replenishing. My order for 2017 arrived and contains the following:

Quantity Name
250 Crocus Joan of Arc
100 Crocus speciosus Albus
50 Cyclamineus Narcissi Jenny
100 Narcissi Tete-a-Tete
20 Lilium Bright Diamond
20 Lilium Foxtrot
10 Lilium Purple Lady
10 Lilium Curly Sue
10 Lilium Venezuela
20 Schubertii
100 Anemone Altrocoerulea
15 Cyclamen Coum Album
10 Cyclamen Hederifolium Album
25 Eremurus Bungei
100 Iris Histrioides Katherine Hodgkin
25 Leucojum Aestivum
25 Leucojum Vernum
10 Lilium candidum
100 Tulip Exotic Emperor
100 Tulip Purissima White Emperor
100 Tulip Red Impression
100 Tulip Big Smiles
100 Tulip Elegant Lady
100 Tulip Purple Blend
100 Tulip Species Turkestanica

We have made a start but the tulips are best not planted before November to avoid “Tulip Fire” so we are going to be busy in November with 700 bulbs to plant! Tulip fire is caused by the fungus Botrytis tulipae. It is closely related to the grey mould pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaf symptoms are visible from when leaves emerge in late winter until they die back in summer.

17_10_29_7444In some areas we have started to cut back the herbaceous plants in preparation for tulips and mulching. However, with so much still flowering it seems a shame to cut out too much.

The dahlias will continue to flower until the first hard frost. Here is Dahlia “Twyning’s After Eight” plus a Red Admiral butterfly!17_10_29_7438This is Geranium ‘Ann Folkard’ which will be cut back soon but is looking great right now.17_10_28_7430This combination of Osteospermum ‘Tresco Purple’ and Salvia ‘Cerro Potosi’ has been looking great since June this year.17_10_29_7445What is this flowering so much at the end of November? Helianthemum ‘Ben Fhada’ a flower I normally associate with the summer but I am not complaining.

If you would like to join in with the End of Month View please do. It would be great if you could add a link to your post in the comments below and link to this post in your post.

2017 Gardening Hours
Week beginning
October 21st
Total 2017 to-date Average per week
28 883 21

Breaking News:

17_10_30_7446Having almost completed this blog and commented on the frost free weather; this morning we had the first frost of the winter! Not enough to hurt the dahlias but they will be hit soon.

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42 thoughts on “End of Month View – October 2017

  1. What a fabulous list of bulbs to plant! Looking forward to seeing the little iris and your lilies in particular. We have frost this morning too – first heavy one of the season, although yesterday there was a light one as well. Can finally tidy up – the garden’s been a mess this year. Are you hosting End of Month View instead of Helen now? I’m going to join in this month and will be back to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Most of your garden images certainly looked much more like summer than autumn but winter will arrive sooner or later so it is always good to enjoy the blooms while you can. Your last shot of frost on the lawn was quite startling!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: End of month view – October 2017 | Duver Diary

  4. Pingback: End of Month View: Times They are a-Changin’ | Rambling in the Garden

  5. My goodness, Steve – you have had your work cut out with all that scarifying and then 700 bulbs to plant! I am happy to say that my bulb order was a little shorter than in previous years 😉 I loved seeing the pictures of your garden – your roses are still looking good and that salvia is fantastic. Must look out for that one! Thanks for ahring and hosting – most welcome. My EOMV is here: https://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com/2017/10/31/end-of-month-view-times-they-are-a-changin/

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I envy your bulb list. If I could find an effective way of defeating the mice I’d have one too. I so miss Spring bulbs! Glad you escaped the worst of the storms, it was hairy here for a bit. The trees which were just turning lost all their leaves so autumn colour is a bit muted this year.
    I’m hoping to get back to more regular blogging next month.. what better way to kick off. Here’s my link:
    https://www.rustyduck.net/2017/10/31/where-did-autumn-go/

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Your garden still looks gorgeous, but I don’t envy you all that work on the lawn. I’m gradually replacing my lawn with flower beds and gravel – although I do like it covered in daisies in the spring and it is nice to walk barefoot on! Gravel is not so pleasing to the feet. You have an awful lot of bulb planting to do too. I love lilies but so do the slugs and snails so I’m not buying more. I might bring them indoors when they start to emerge and see if that helps them to survive. The trouble with this warm weather is that the gastropods are still on the march. I have a write up for the end of the month too, but to be honest nothing much has changed since the end of September.
    https://cornwallincolours.wordpress.com/2017/10/31/in-my-garden-october/

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pingback: End of the Month View – as October closes. | Bramble Garden

  9. Wow, what a lot of work you put in. I dare not show you my lawn! Looking forward to seeing all those bulbs, it always looks fabulous. Here’s my garden, although I hesitate to show you to be honest. Most of it is a terrible mess. I’m hoping to get on top of it over the winter. All the best. Karen https://bramblegarden.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Pingback: End of month view – October 2017 – garden ruminations

  11. Pingback: In My Garden: October – Under a Cornish Sky

  12. Pingback: End of Month View of the Garden. End of October 2017 | The Cynical Gardener

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